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Just wondering but what's best practice for calling methods (specifically in java, in this case)

If I have 6 functions that must be called, and are pretty logically distinct:

so, say...

private void step1() { .. }
private void step2() { .. }
private void step3() { .. }
private void step4() { .. }

Is it better for me to just call them sequentially in my main method as

step1();
step2();
step3();
step4();

Or is it better if at the end of the step1 function I call step2? i.e.

private void step1() { 
    ..
    ..
    step2();
}
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closed as not constructive by Wooble, iccthedral, maba, assylias, Nandkumar Tekale Oct 5 '12 at 14:06

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5  
It only and really depends on the code in them. –  iccthedral Oct 5 '12 at 13:56
1  
I'd argue that if step2 always gets called immediately after step1, etc., they're not "logically distinct" and could just be one method. –  Wooble Oct 5 '12 at 13:56
    
Does step 1 always rely on step 2 being performed immediately after it? –  Jordan Kaye Oct 5 '12 at 13:56
    
hmm, that's a pretty good point. step2 is dependent on step1 but not the other way around. Step1 can be run by itself, albeit the program might not be very useful –  randomafk Oct 5 '12 at 14:00

5 Answers 5

Do not over-think it.

The first option is more clear, readable and self-explainning.

step1();
step2();
step3();
step4();

or

try{
    step1();
    step2();
    step3();
    step4();
} catch (StepException e) {
   // process failed
   ...
}
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Makes sense ofcourse, but what if step1() fails, are you sure you want to run the following steps afterwards? –  Rob Oct 5 '12 at 14:13
    
That assumption was not stated in the question. But I improved my answer to acommodate to your comment. –  user1598390 Oct 5 '12 at 14:53
    
True on that, but I included try catch in my answer and got a -2 for it. All options given here are possible, but I assumed that you don't want code execution on the other 3 methods if the first one fails for example. (I've voted your answer up now) –  Rob Oct 5 '12 at 16:47
    
@Robuust the only way of method2() being executed is method1() didn't throw an exception, the only way of method3() being executed is method2() didn't throw an exception, and so on. –  user1598390 Oct 5 '12 at 17:39

Your question doesn't have enough context information.

What I'd say in general is: better use a main method that calls its parts. Because it reflects the way the general process is built.

But there can be exceptions. Anyway these exceptions could be built some other way (by example: step1 code returns a code that is parse by main code and then call step2). This way stack is not charged with not useful intermediate calls. And semantics are better kept.

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It depends if they rely upon each other. If step2 relies on step1 then you should use

private void step1() { 
   ..
   ..
   step2();
}

This removes any implicit knowledge that the caller must have on the methods (esp if they are public)

If they dont rely on each other then your first option is simpler.

(I'd be interested to know more about this scenario as this looks a bit smelly to me)

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If they are logically distinct then step1() should not call step2().

Just make the 4 calls.

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If step1 and step2 are logically distinct that pretty much means that they can be used for different inputs. Now there is a rule of thumb that you can use to maybe make the steps less and pretty much get your work done in a better way.

First of you shall check if your methods are distinct in the way they do different stuff, not for the exact same arguments and that you may find yourself or someone else coding with them calling pretty much stepN by itself without the previous ones or at least without all of them. If so, then it is fine to keep them all as they are and call them sequentially.

If not, then refactor your code so that stepN1 and stepN2 that are called always one after another to be one stepN and you get a logically distinct method that is self contained. If you call methods one after another with the exact same arguments over and over always without having a separate need for them to exist alone, then make it one method, merge the code that is always ran in one piece.

If you bind step2 within the code of step1 this means step1 is pretty much only usable within the context of running the second step as well, meaning it loses its logically distinct functionality in a sense, which means you shall really merge the two in this case or use the first way. So generally stick to the first way and improve your coding in the suggested way if it applies to your case! Exception is the case step1 is only complete using step2 within it but step2 trully has a distinct functionality for itself and can be used for another purpose within your program. Then you can use the second way.

Keep in mind that it is not only way 1 or way 2, you can still blend them to fit your task. And performance is not an issue I believe (anyone cares to correct me if I am wrong?)!

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