Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 2 shared libraries(let them be 1.so,2.so) and program(a.out). 2.so is linked to 1.so and a.out - it has some functions that is used in 1 and a.

The code of 2.so is

FILE *in;
char filename[128];
int func_printer(int a)
{
    if(strlen(filename)==0)
    {
       sprintf(filename,"%ld",time(NULL);
    }
    if((in=fopen(filename,"a"))==NULL)return;
    fprintf(in,"%i",a);
    fclose(in);
}

a.out has next

extern int func_printer(int);
extern void some_action();
int main()
{
    some_action();
    func_printer(2);
    return 0;
}

And finally 1.so has method some_action

extern int func_printer(int);
void some_action()
{ 
    func_printer(1);
    printf("hello world");
    return;
}

So when a.out starts, it call's 1.so(some_action()) and it call's 2.so(func_printer). It create file with name of timestamp(t1), write in it some info. After that 1.so calls 2.so(func_printer) and it creates another file's with timestamp.

Is it possible in this situation that some_action write always to t1, but when program starts again it should write to another file. All in all simply when program starts all libraries should know the filename where to write(without hard predifining the file name like char *filename="somefile.txt";)?

share|improve this question
    
Do I understand this right: You want to have you app write one file per run? The file name shall change from one run to the next (assuming you do not run the app more than once a second)? –  alk Oct 5 '12 at 14:32
    
yes, all libraries that it call write to one file –  John Square Oct 5 '12 at 15:05
    
So I do not really understand what you need to know. –  alk Oct 5 '12 at 15:45

1 Answer 1

It seems like the only thing that writes to a file is 2.so. Just expose a setter:

char filename[128];

void set_filename(char * path) {
    strncpy(filename, sizeof(filename), path);
    filename[sizeof(filename) - 1] = '\0';
}

int func_printer(int a)
{
    FILE *in;
    if(strlen(filename)==0) {
       sprintf(filename,"%ld",time(NULL);
    }
    if((in=fopen(filename,"a"))==NULL)return;
    fprintf(in,"%i",a);
    fclose(in);
}
share|improve this answer
    
It might be I did not really got the OP's question. But I do not see any help to it in your answer ... –  alk Oct 5 '12 at 14:28
    
I boiled it down to: he calls func_printer from various places and wants to control where func_printer puts its output. Solution: add a function that controls where func_printer puts its output. –  willglynn Oct 5 '12 at 14:33
    
and how control function that control func_printer? –  John Square Oct 5 '12 at 15:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.