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I am getting the following error message when trying to tweak Listing 3.4 from Jon Skeet's book, C# in depth...

The type 'list_3_4.Dog' cannot be used as type parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'list_3_4.Program.CompareToDefault(T)'. There is no implicit reference conversion from 'list_3_4.Dog' to 'System.IComparable'.

Here is my code...

using System;

namespace list_3_4
{
     class Program
     {
          static void Main(string[] args)
          {
               //string mystring;
               Dog d = new Dog("howie");

               Console.WriteLine(CompareToDefault("x"));
               Console.WriteLine(CompareToDefault(10));
               Console.WriteLine(CompareToDefault(0));
               Console.WriteLine(CompareToDefault(-10));              
               Console.WriteLine(CompareToDefault(DateTime.MinValue));

               Console.WriteLine(CompareToDefault(d));

               Console.ReadKey();
          }

          static int CompareToDefault<T> (T value) where T: IComparable<T>
          {
               return value.CompareTo(default(T));               
          }

     }

     public class Dog 
     {
          private string _name;

          public Dog(string name)
          {
               _name = name;
          }
         }
}

How do I add a reference type like a "Dog" to work with Jon Skeets code listing??? I understand that Dog needs to implement IComparable but I don't know how!

share|improve this question
    
what's the question? –  elyashiv Oct 5 '12 at 14:18
1  
Your Dog class doesn't appear to implement IComparable<Dog>, as specified by the generic constraint where T : IComparable<T>. –  Adam Houldsworth Oct 5 '12 at 14:18
1  
+1 For a code sample that I could copy, paste and play with. Although a question would have been nice lol –  Adam Houldsworth Oct 5 '12 at 14:25
    
the following wont work public class Dog : IComparable<T>, I tried public class Dog: IComarable<Dog>...that works! –  Demetrius Berlioz Oct 5 '12 at 14:26
1  
@DemetriusBerlioz This is nonsensical for reference types, as they will always default to null using default(T), so you may as well just test for null: if (d == null). –  Adam Houldsworth Oct 5 '12 at 14:28

2 Answers 2

You define the methods by saying you need a type T that is an IComparable<T> :

where T: IComparable<T>

But Dog does not implement IComparable<Dog>

You need to do:

public class Dog : IComparable<Dog>
{
 //this will allow you to do a quick name comparison
 public string Name { get; set;}
 public int CompareTo(Dog other)
 {//compare dogs by name
        return this._name.CompareTo(other.Name);
 }
}

Note: default(T) will return null for reference types, so you should do a null check somewhere. Read about default on msdn.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Demetrius The final implementation that you decide upon should do null checking on _name and other and other.Name. –  Adam Houldsworth Oct 5 '12 at 14:22
    
You don't actually need the Name property. If you do add it you should at least make the setter private too. –  Servy Oct 5 '12 at 14:22
    
@AdamHouldsworth or you could just use the static string.Compare which does the null checking for you. –  Servy Oct 5 '12 at 14:23
    
Yes, I attempted an implementation as you point out, but didn't realize what the "CompareTo" was attached to...just the object itself...as in this.CompareTo(other)...that won't work. As Alex points out above, it's off the property..._name.CompareTo(other._name)...what if there where no property??? –  Demetrius Berlioz Oct 5 '12 at 14:23
    
@Servy Fair enough. I cannot remember the implementation specifics, so I'm not entirely sure if other also needs a null check. For clarity I always tend to, but I've never actually tested that lol –  Adam Houldsworth Oct 5 '12 at 14:23

Your Dog class should implement ICompareable<T>.

 public class Dog: IComparable<Dog>
 {
      private string _name;

      public Dog(string name)
      {
           _name = name;
      }

      public int CompareTo( Dog other )
      {
           if (other == null)
               return 1;
           return string.Compare( _name, other._name );
      }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
public class Dog: IComparable<T> is not working, only public class Dog: IComparable<Dog> is working...sort of...now I am getting a NullReferenceException ??? –  Demetrius Berlioz Oct 5 '12 at 14:29
    
@DemetriusBerlioz I have added a check for other == null, it should work now. –  Alex Oct 5 '12 at 15:51

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