Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written a stored procedure:

SELECT 
    Encounter.EncounterNumber, 
    substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) as Acct, 
    MedicalRecordNumber, 
    [AdmitDate - CCYYMMDD] as AdmitDate, 
    [DischargeDate - CCYYMMDD] as DischDate, 
    DischargeDisposition, 
    Encounter.Age, 
    EnctrAPR.APRDRG, 
    Age18, Age18To64, Age65
from 
    Encounter
    full outer join EnctrAPR on 
        substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) = EnctrAPR.EncounterNumber
where 
    HSP# = 1
    and InOutCode = 'I'
    and ActualTotalCharge >0 
    and AdmitSubService <> 'SIG'
    and [DischargeDate - CCYYMMDD] between @StartDate and @EndDate
    and Encounter.Age >= 18

I would like to use the EXCEPT or INTERSECT directives to show me rows that are not in EnctrAPR that are in Encounter. Note that I have different EncounterNumber formats on the two tables.

How would I accomplish this?

share|improve this question
    
If the numbers are different formats then how do you match them up? Is it based on every other field? –  JNK Oct 5 '12 at 14:39
    
The EncounterNumber in Encounter is varchar(20) and EncounterNunber in EnctrAPR is varchar(50). The values in the Encounter table are pre-pended with 001 thus the need for a substring in order to join the two tables. Do I need to prepend the 001 to the EncounterNumber in EnctrAPR for EXCEPT or INTERSECT to work? –  SidC Oct 5 '12 at 14:48
    
EXCEPT and INTERSECT look at all the values on a row, so yes. Otherwise the EncounterNumber fields will never match appropriately. –  JNK Oct 5 '12 at 14:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't really need intersect or except for what your looking for but you could it this way.

SELECT Encounter.EncounterNumber, substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) as Acct,   
MedicalRecordNumber, [AdmitDate - CCYYMMDD] as AdmitDate, [DischargeDate - CCYYMMDD] as 
DischDate, DischargeDisposition, Encounter.Age, EnctrAPR.APRDRG, Age18, Age18To64, Age65
from Encounter
full outer join EnctrAPR on
substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) = EnctrAPR.EncounterNumber
where HSP# = 1
and InOutCode = 'I'
and ActualTotalCharge >0 
and AdmitSubService <> 'SIG'
and [DischargeDate - CCYYMMDD] between @StartDate and @EndDate
and Encounter.Age >= 18
INTERSECT -- OR EXCEPT
SELECT Encounter.EncounterNumber, substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) as Acct,   
MedicalRecordNumber, [AdmitDate - CCYYMMDD] as AdmitDate, [DischargeDate - CCYYMMDD] as 
DischDate, DischargeDisposition, Encounter.Age, EnctrAPR.APRDRG, Age18, Age18To64, Age65
from EnctrAPR 
join Encounter on
substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) = EnctrAPR.EncounterNumber
where HSP# = 1
and InOutCode = 'I'
and ActualTotalCharge >0 
and AdmitSubService <> 'SIG'
and [DischargeDate - CCYYMMDD] between @StartDate and @EndDate
and Encounter.Age >= 18

You could accomplish it this way, but I wouldn't recommend it. It's a bit of a brute force approach. To get only the records that are in EnctrAPR you could change your FROM EnctrAPR and use an inner join to Encounter.

SELECT Encounter.EncounterNumber, substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) as Acct,   
MedicalRecordNumber, [AdmitDate - CCYYMMDD] as AdmitDate, [DischargeDate - CCYYMMDD] as 
DischDate, DischargeDisposition, Encounter.Age, EnctrAPR.APRDRG, Age18, Age18To64, Age65
from EnctrAPR 
join Encounter on
substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) = EnctrAPR.EncounterNumber
where HSP# = 1
and InOutCode = 'I'
and ActualTotalCharge >0 
and AdmitSubService <> 'SIG'
and [DischargeDate - CCYYMMDD] between @StartDate and @EndDate
and Encounter.Age >= 18

To get only the records that don't exist in EnctrApr I'd use a left join:

SELECT Encounter.EncounterNumber, substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) as Acct,   
MedicalRecordNumber, [AdmitDate - CCYYMMDD] as AdmitDate, [DischargeDate - CCYYMMDD] as 
DischDate, DischargeDisposition, Encounter.Age, EnctrAPR.APRDRG, Age18, Age18To64, Age65
from Encounter 
left outer join EnctrAPR on
substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) = EnctrAPR.EncounterNumber
where HSP# = 1
and InOutCode = 'I'
and ActualTotalCharge >0 
and AdmitSubService <> 'SIG'
and [DischargeDate - CCYYMMDD] between @StartDate and @EndDate
and Encounter.Age >= 18
and EnctrAPR.EncounterNumber IS NULL
share|improve this answer
    
The last line in your left outer join example gives me an error stating Invalid Column Name EnctrAPR. Should I replace that with EnctrAPR.EncounterNumber? –  SidC Oct 5 '12 at 15:28
    
Your right. Updated now. –  jTC Oct 5 '12 at 15:31
    
Intercept and Except are wildly under used IMO. But in this case you're essentially doing the query twice without much gains. I use them to isolate id's from a number of tables usually, because they are incredibly fast compared to using joins to get the same data. –  jTC Oct 5 '12 at 15:54

To get just those records that ARE in Encounter and NOT in EnctrAPR, then just use left outer join instead of full outer join, and add a clause excluding null values for EnctrAPR.EncounterNumber.

i.e.

SELECT  
    Encounter.EncounterNumber,  
    substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) as Acct,  
    ...
    EnctrAPR.APRDRG,
    Age18, Age18To64, Age65 
from  
    Encounter 
    left outer join EnctrAPR on  
        substring(Encounter.EncounterNumber,4,9) = EnctrAPR.EncounterNumber 
where  
    EnctrAPR.EncounterNumber is null
    and HSP# = 1 
    and InOutCode = 'I' 
    and ActualTotalCharge >0  
    and AdmitSubService <> 'SIG' 
    and [DischargeDate - CCYYMMDD] between @StartDate and @EndDate 
    and Encounter.Age >= 18 

Note though that the value for EnctrAPR.APRDRG will always be null, as EnctrAPR doesn't have a matching row.

share|improve this answer
    
A more efficient way to do this is to use NOT EXISTS - LEFT OUTER JOIN is slower and also has the potential of creating duplicates –  JNK Oct 5 '12 at 14:50
    
That's an alternative. Just to note though that in this case, there won't be any duplicates as there is only one pair of matching fields in the join, and the where clause discards those records from the right table that satisfy the join, so even if there were 2 rhs records for every lhs record, they don't appear. –  Neil Moss Oct 5 '12 at 14:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.