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I'm coding my version of the String class, but Valgrind whines about my implementation of the << operator for my string. The error is at the wrong line, if I print char by char it works great.

Where am I wrong?

Valgrind error:

==2769== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s)

==2769== at 0x4C2AC28: strlen (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)

==2769== by 0x4ECAD60: std::basic_ostream >& std::operator<< >(std::basic_ostream >&, char const*) (in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.17)

==2769== by 0x400BD5: operator<<(std::ostream&, String&) (string.cpp:22)

==2769== by 0x400AAC: main (main.cpp:12)

My << operator for string:

ostream & operator << (ostream & o, String & inS) {
    o << inS._pData << " "; (* the wrong line *)
    return o;
}

My String class:

class String {
    public:
         unsigned _size;
         char *   _pData;
         String();
         String(const char* inCString);
};

Constructor (for char*):

String::String(const char* inCString) {
    _size = strlen(inCString);
    _pData = new char[_size + 1];
    strncpy(_pData, inCString, _size);
}

Main.cpp:

int main(int, char**) {
    String s1("hello");
    cout << s1;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Can I ask why you're going to the trouble of re-implementing string? –  Benj Oct 5 '12 at 14:50
    
Did you obey the Rule of Three? –  Mooing Duck Oct 5 '12 at 20:42
    
@MooingDuck : Yup, but not the whole code's here; only the relevant ones. –  Cqnqrd Oct 5 '12 at 21:13
    
@Benj : it's a classwork; first month of cpp for us, why wanted you to know ? –  Cqnqrd Oct 5 '12 at 21:15
    
@Cqnqrd Classwork is a totally legit reason, if you were going to do this in production code, I'd call you crazy ;-) –  Benj Oct 5 '12 at 22:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I don't recommend using raw strings like this.

However, the culprit is here:

strncpy(_pData, inCString, _size+1);

Or, alternatively, store the NUL-termination character manually:

_pData[_size] = 0;

By missing the NUL-termination character, the output operation will just keep on running past the end of the string. (The behaviour may happen to look okay, since the character may be nul by chance, depending on compiler, options etc.)

Hint:

  • consider using C++ style instead of C API's
  • if you must use C-style char*, at least use stdrup and free
  • if you insist on doing NUL-terminated strings, consider writing that the C++ way too:

    #include <iostream>
    #include <vector>
    
    class String
    {
    public:
        std::vector<char> _data;
        String();
        String(const char* inCString);
    };
    
    std::ostream & operator << (std::ostream & o, String const& inS)
    {
        o.write(inS._data.data(), inS._data.size());
        return o << ' ';
    }
    
    String::String(const char* inCString)
    {
        for (const char* it=inCString; it && *it; ++it)
            _data.push_back(*it);
    }
    
    int main(int, char**)
    {
        String s1("hello");
        std::cout << s1;
        return 0;
    }
    
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1  
@cqnqrd You should also be careful to initialize _pData with an empty (null-terminated) string in your constructor with no parameters –  penelope Oct 5 '12 at 14:57
1  
Indeed I must use char* (student) but thanks for advices, I'll practice them. –  Cqnqrd Oct 5 '12 at 15:38

Because you fail to write the zero byte at the end. You need:

strncpy(_pData, inCString, _size + 1);
//                              ^^^^

You should always read the manual very carefully with the n-versions of C string functions, since they all have subtly different semantics.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh ok, I need to copy it too. Thanks for the advice, I'll do them carefully now. –  Cqnqrd Oct 5 '12 at 15:32

Notice that you are not explicit initializing your data members, you are assigning a value to them:

...in order to initialize, you should change to:

String::String(const char* inCString) :
    _size(strlen(inCString)),
    _pData(new char[_size + 1])
{
    strncpy(_pData, inCString, _size);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This has nothing to do with the OP's problem. –  Kerrek SB Oct 5 '12 at 14:57
2  
@penelope: no, they're not. ints and pointers are not initialized unless constructed explicitly, a la C::C() : m_size(), m_ptr() {}. –  xtofl Oct 5 '12 at 14:59
    
@penelope, they're POD types, and so the default constructor is not called. The _size value is undefined and _pData is pointing to garbage. –  Hugo Juarez Corrá Oct 5 '12 at 15:01

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