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I have some global variables in head's tag:

<script type="text/javascript">
    var apiRoot = 'http://localhost:8000/api',
        apiUrl = apiRoot,
        apiBadgeUrl = apiRoot + '/badges',
        apiLevelUrl = apiRoot + '/levels',
        apiBehaviorUrl = apiRoot + '/behaviors',
        apiTrophyUrl = apiRoot + '/trophies',
        apiUserUrl = apiRoot + '/users',
        apiWidgetPreferencesUrl = apiRoot + '/widgetPreferences';
</script>

I want to use in angular expression in html file but my tries are fails:

{{ $window.apiRoot }} or {{ apiRoot }} 
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

These expressions are evaluated against the current scope. If you have not set them in your scope via a controller, it will not evaluate. See http://docs.angularjs.org/guide/expression

Example:

function MyCtrl($scope)
{
   $scope.apiRoot = apiRoot;
}

HTML:

<div ng-controller="MyCtrl">
   {{apiRoot}}
</div>

As has been mentioned, while the above example works, it is not reccommended. The better way would be to set these variables in a service and then get them through the service.

function MyCtrl($scope, apiRootService)
{
   $scope.apiRoot = apiRootService.getApiRoot();
}

The service:

angular.module('myServices', []).factory('apiRootService', function() {
    var apiRoot = 'http://localhost:8000/api',
    apiUrl = apiRoot,
    apiBadgeUrl = apiRoot + '/badges',
    apiLevelUrl = apiRoot + '/levels',
    apiBehaviorUrl = apiRoot + '/behaviors',
    apiTrophyUrl = apiRoot + '/trophies',
    apiUserUrl = apiRoot + '/users',
    apiWidgetPreferencesUrl = apiRoot + '/widgetPreferences';
    return {
      getApiRoot: function() {
         return apiRoot
      },
      //all the other getters
   });
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While this method works it is very, very bad for unit testing :-( –  pkozlowski.opensource Oct 5 '12 at 21:26
    
@pkozlowski.opensource You are absolutely correct. I've updated my answer to show the more correct way. Please correct me if I'm wrong in my update. –  dnc253 Oct 5 '12 at 21:45
2  
It should (I think) be called apiRootService (without the dollar sign). Angular uses the dollar sign for its internal names. –  Sam Barnum Feb 15 '13 at 20:48
    
There's no reason the service couldn't have the $ on front, but, you're right, it's recommended that you don't. I've updated the answer. –  dnc253 Apr 26 '13 at 19:21

The best practice is to move apiRoot to a Service and inject that service into your controller. See here.

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Another way to do this would be to add your global's to the $rootScope. You can do this by adding the following to your app module definition

angular.module('myApp', ['ngRoute'])
    .run(function ($rootScope){
        $rootScope.myAPI = {
             apiRoot: 'http://localhost:8000/api',
             apiUrl: apiRoot,
             apiBadgeUrl: apiRoot + '/badges',
             apiLevelUrl: apiRoot + '/levels',
             apiBehaviorUrl: apiRoot + '/behaviors',
             apiTrophyUrl: apiRoot + '/trophies',
             apiUserUrl: apiRoot + '/users',
             apiWidgetPreferencesUrl: apiRoot + '/widgetPreferences'
        }
    });


While a service does work, the angular documentation recommends against this. http://docs.angularjs.org/misc/faq

Conversely, don't create a service whose only purpose in life is to store and return bits of data.

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