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If TCP socket is set to non-blocking mode and a socket send buffer is set initially, then send is used in a loop to send all the data. If send fails due to EAGAIN error, can the send-socket buffer be increased? I am using Linux OS. I wanted to understand whether resizing of sendbuffer size is allowed or not. On tcp man page, "On individual connections, the socket buffer size must be set prior to the listen(2) or connect(2) calls in order to have it take effect." Thats why the question arised

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I believe the man page is wrong. I believe it should say that a buffer size of over 64k must be set before listen() or connect(), because that's when the window scale negotiation occurs. –  EJP Oct 5 '12 at 22:28
    
And indeed even in that case it should say before accept(), not listen(). –  EJP Oct 6 '12 at 4:18
    
Please note that this applies only to the receive buffer, not the send buffer. –  EJP May 2 '13 at 21:34

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That would be an implementation detail of the in-kernel network stack, i.e. of the operating system you run on (which you don't state). I believe you can do this on most modern OS-es since it's just a number limiting memory dedicated to a given socket, but it's an entirely wrong way of approaching the problem because:

  • You cannot increase send buffer size indefinitely, the OS will cap it at some point.
  • TCP provides you with flow control - slow receiver slows down fast sender - and that's an advantage of TCP related to its reliability, so if the receiver does not consume data fast enough, shoving more data into the kernel memory does not improve the situation in any way.
  • You are just being lazy and want the kernel do all the buffering for you.

Figure out your traffic burst memory requirements, pre-set socket send buffer sizes, buffer on the application side.

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I am using Linux OS. I wanted to understand whether resizing of sendbuffer size is allowed or not. On tcp man pagelink, "On individual connections, the socket buffer size must be set prior to the listen(2) or connect(2) calls in order to have it take effect." Thats why the question arised.. –  user1723421 Oct 5 '12 at 18:25
    
So that's the answer for Linux then - you can't, you have to pre-set it. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Oct 5 '12 at 18:27
    
So, should send buffer size be preset to max buffer size on application side, if I need to use socket in non-blocking mode and send all the data? –  user1723421 Oct 5 '12 at 18:53
    
Not necessarily to the maximum - large enough for your application. You might still hit that limit if the receiver is slow enough. That's why I'm saying you need to do buffering on the application side as well. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Oct 5 '12 at 19:06
    
When I tested setting SO_SNDBUF using setsockopt, I could see that using getsockopt, buffersize got changed to the new value –  user1723421 Oct 5 '12 at 19:09

You can try tuning the networking buffers (http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/linux-tcp-tuning/) but that's probably not a good idea. The problem can happen no matter what size buffer you have so you need to code to handle that case.

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