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Ok i know its kinda weird question but... For example in javascript we could write a program like this:

var a = 1;
testFunction(++a, ++a, a);
function testFunction(x, y, z){
      document.writeln("<br />x = " + x);
      document.writeln("<br />y = " + y);
      document.writeln("<br />z = " + z);
}

and we would get an output:

x = 2
y = 3
z = 3

This implies that parameters are trully evaluated from left to right in javascript. In C we would get output

x = 3
y = 3
z = 3

I was wondering if we could do the same in python or is it impossible since its a pass by value reference language? I ve made a simple program but i dont think that proves anything:

x=2
def f(x,y,z):
    print(x,y,z)

f(x*2,x*2,x**2)
print(x)

4 4 4
2

Python wont let me do any new assignment within the function parameter when i call it (for example f(x=4,x,x) or something like this). I need that for a some kind of "exercise" although its more for personal clarification. I also have a doubt if the title of this question is the right one but I couldnt think a better one. Thanks in advance.

EDIT:: Ok i ve accepted larsmans answer cause its simple and juicy but for more in depth answer you can check Anuj Gupta as well. Thanks again.

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Actually, in C, you'd get UB (so the output might be different depending on the environment). –  nneonneo Oct 5 '12 at 15:55

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted
>>> def f(x, y): pass
...
>>> f(print(1), print(2))
1
2
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+1 Having see all the asnwers i guess thats the correct one. –  Geo Papas Oct 5 '12 at 15:58
    
Short and simple -- very nice. –  Ethan Furman Oct 5 '12 at 16:02

Disassemble the function call.

>>> def foo():
...   bar(x+1, x+2, x+3)
... 
>>> dis.dis(foo)
  2           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (bar)
              3 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (x)
              6 LOAD_CONST               1 (1)
              9 BINARY_ADD          
             10 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (x)
             13 LOAD_CONST               2 (2)
             16 BINARY_ADD          
             17 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (x)
             20 LOAD_CONST               3 (3)
             23 BINARY_ADD          
             24 CALL_FUNCTION            3
             27 POP_TOP             
             28 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             31 RETURN_VALUE        
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1  
Wow thats a cool answer but its more like confusing. Is this some kind of general evaluation order of parameters? –  Geo Papas Oct 5 '12 at 15:30
    
Cant say that this works. Did u foget something to import? I get NameError: name 'dis' is not defined –  Geo Papas Oct 5 '12 at 15:55
    
I didn't forget to import it... O.O –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 5 '12 at 15:56
    
Well i get this Traceback (most recent call last): File "<pyshell#16>", line 1, in <module> dis.dis(foo) NameError: name 'dis' is not defined when i type dis.dis(foo). Dont know why. –  Geo Papas Oct 5 '12 at 16:01
    
Add import dis. –  nneonneo Oct 5 '12 at 16:02

(Using Python 3)

>>> a=[]
>>> f=print(
    a.append(1),a[:],
    a.append(2),a[:],
    a.append(3),a[:]
)
None [1] None [1, 2] None [1, 2, 3]

Archive:

>>> a=[]
>>> f=print(a.append(1),a,a.append(2),a,a.append(3),a)

Curiously enough (at first), this code produces:

None [1, 2, 3] None [1, 2, 3] None [1, 2, 3]

However, dis(f) makes this clearer:

>>> dis(f)

  1           0 LOAD_NAME                0 (print) #Loads the value of 'print' into memory. Precisely, the value is pushed to the TOS (Top of Stack)
    -->       3 LOAD_NAME                1 (a) #Loads the value of object 'a' 
              6 LOAD_ATTR                2 (append) #Loads the append attribute (in this case method)
              9 LOAD_CONST               0 (1) #Loads the constant 1
             12 CALL_FUNCTION            1 #a.append(1) is called
             15 LOAD_NAME                1 (a) #for print(...,a,...)
             18 LOAD_NAME                1 (a) #for the next a.append()
             21 LOAD_ATTR                2 (append) 
             24 LOAD_CONST               1 (2) 
             27 CALL_FUNCTION            1 #a.append(2)
             30 LOAD_NAME                1 (a) 
             33 LOAD_NAME                1 (a) 
             36 LOAD_ATTR                2 (append) 
             39 LOAD_CONST               2 (3) 
             42 CALL_FUNCTION            1 #a.append(3)
             45 LOAD_NAME                1 (a) #loads a to be used thrice by print
             48 CALL_FUNCTION            6 #calls print
             51 PRINT_EXPR                 #prints TOS and clears it
             52 LOAD_CONST               3 (None) #Loads None
             55 RETURN_VALUE             #Returns None

The output of dis(f) is what we expected - L-to-R evaluation. Essentially, this "discrepancy" is a consequence of print() being evaluated last. By then, the value of a has changed to [1,2,3] and the same final object is printed thrice.

If we replace a with a[:], we get the expected result.

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@Geo Papas: remmember that, in Python 2, print is not a function call. So use the Python 3 print() function. –  cdarke Oct 5 '12 at 15:41
    
This example is Python 2, check you get the same result using Python 3 (pretty sure you will). –  cdarke Oct 5 '12 at 15:43
    
Sorry but it doesnt work i guess there is a change in python 3. I get output None [1, 2, 3] None [1, 2, 3] None [1, 2, 3] –  Geo Papas Oct 5 '12 at 15:53
    
Answer updated. Thanks for pointing this out, @GeoPapas –  Anuj Gupta Oct 5 '12 at 16:01
1  
This works under Python 2 if you first use from __future__ import print_function +1, good answer –  Colt 45 Oct 8 '12 at 20:54

A custom class can help here:

class Tester(object):
    "test object to reveal left to right evaluation"
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value
    def __add__(self, value):
        print("adding ", value)
        return Tester(self.value + value)
    def __repr__(self):
        return repr(self.value)

and when run:

--> t = Tester(7)
--> t
7
--> t = t + 7
adding  7
--> t
14
--> def blah(a, b, c):
...   print(a, b, c)
... 
--> blah(t+1, t+2, t+3)
adding  1
adding  2
adding  3
15 16 17
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This shows it as well IMHO:

>>> '{} {} {}'.format(x,x+1,x+2)
'1 2 3'

Edit:

>>> def f(t):   return time.time()-t 
...         

>>> t1=time.time(); '{:.4} {:.4} {:.4}'.format(f(t1),f(t1),f(t1))
'5.007e-06 7.868e-06 9.06e-06'
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2  
There is nothing is this example to show that x+2 was not evaluated before x. –  Ethan Furman Oct 5 '12 at 16:00

Short answer: left to right

Example: Since this is a question that always pops in my head when I am doing arithmetic operations (should I convert to float and which number), an example from that aspect is presented:

>>> a = 1/2/3/4/5/4/3
>>> a
0

When we divide integers, not surprisingly it gets lower rounded.

>>> a = 1/2/3/4/5/4/float(3)
>>> a
0.0

If we typecast the last integer to float, we will still get zero, since by the time our number gets divided by the float has already become 0 because of the integer division.

>>> a = 1/2/3/float(4)/5/4/3
>>> a
0.0

Same scenario as above but shifting the float typecast a little closer to the left side.

>>> a = float(1)/2/3/4/5/4/3
>>> a
0.0006944444444444445

Finally, when we typecast the first integer to float, the result is the desired one, since beginning from the first division, i.e. the leftmost one, we use floats.

Extra 1: If you are trying to answer that to improve arithmetic evaluation, you should check this

Extra 2: Please be careful of the following scenario:

>>> a = float(1/2/3/4/5/4/3)
>>> a
0.0
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