Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a reusable barrel shifter; it takes an input array of bits and shifts them a certain number of positions (determined by another input). I want to parameterize the module so that it works for any n.

The number of select lines required is determined by n --> i.e., SHIFT_CNT = log2(NUMBITS-1)+1 in the code below. It's considered bad form in my organization (and I think overall) to have ports that are not of standard_logic_vector or std_logic, so I used a standard_logic_vector for the number of select lines. I need to adjust the length of the std_logic_vector based on the input generic. Is there a way to do this without using a second generic? I've seen this post, but it doesn't deal with generics. This post eliminates the generics entirely or uses the log value as the generic, which isn't as intuitive to future users (and could cause problems if the INPUT is not a power of two).

The declaration of SHIFT_CNT below is definitely incorrect; is there a way to automatically generate the length in the entity declaration without using a second generic?

entity BarrelShifter is

generic ( NUMBITS : integer :=8);                                                   
Port    ( INPUT     : in   std_logic_vector (NUMBITS-1 downto 0);                
          OUTPUT    : out  std_logic_vector (NUMBITS-1 downto 0);                
          SHIFT_CNT : in   std_logic_vector ((NUMBITS-1)'length downto 0)                 
        );                                                               

end BarrelShifter;

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

You can use math library for calc log2 and ceil of logarit result to declare size of SHIFT_CNT.

use IEEE.math_real.all;

or specific functions

use IEEE.math_real."ceil";
use IEEE.math_real."log2";

For example you want to calc clog2 of a

result := integer(ceil(log2(real(a))));

If you just use it for calculate paramater, your code is synthesizable (I did it).

If you don' want use it in entity, you can declare it in library or generic with this function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Khanh; I did this as a stopgap, and the ceil and log2 functions somehow always give me an extra bit. It gets pruned off anyway, but I was hoping there was something more compact that didn't require libraries or additional FPGA resources. –  NickD Oct 8 '12 at 12:25
    
It mean you want floor of log2 for smaller bit. For example, result of log 2 is 1.34, the ceil is 2 and floor is 1. I think this required library is standard (IEEE standard) and don't care about it. Another method is use 2 parameter to declare. At top file, you can use this function. –  Khanh Oct 8 '12 at 12:36
    
@user1723509, using a library in a way described in this or the other answer shouldn't use any additional FPGA resources at all, since the function's output can be resolved during compile/synthesis time. –  FriendFX Apr 9 '13 at 4:23
    
Due to rounding issues, this may yield unexpected results, especially when used with floor... –  Karsten Becker May 19 at 15:39

You can create a log2-function in a library, like this:

   function f_log2 (x : positive) return natural is
      variable i : natural;
   begin
      i := 0;  
      while (2**i < x) and i < 31 loop
         i := i + 1;
      end loop;
      return i;
   end function;

If the library is imported you may then specify the port like this:

shift_cnt : in std_logic_vector(f_log2(NUMBITS)-1 downto 0)

It is a somewhat ugly solution, but it doesn't use any resources (since the function is pure and all the inputs are known at compile time).

I usually do this, but you may prefer specifying the log value as the generic like you're mentioning.

share|improve this answer
    
That was one of my concerns -- I didn't want to write a function that would require FPGA resources to calculate. I'd still like something that is totally self-contained if possible (as opposed to writing a library and then remembering to include it anywhere I need it) –  NickD Oct 8 '12 at 12:25
    
I can see why you would want that (I would too, since it's such a common problem!) but I'm pretty sure there's not a more elegant way to do it. In my company we have a library with common functions such as this one that we import in all source files. –  pc3e Oct 9 '12 at 15:05

Two alternative approaches:

You could work it backwards and have the generic as shift_bits - then calculate the width of the input and output vectors from that:

generic ( shift_bits: integer :=3);                                                   
Port    ( INPUT     : in   std_logic_vector ((2**shift_bits)-1 downto 0);                
          OUTPUT    : out  std_logic_vector ((2**shift_bits)-1 downto 0);                
          SHIFT_CNT : in   std_logic_vector (shift_bits-1 downto 0)                 
        ); 

Or treat the count as a number:

generic ( NUMBITS : integer :=8);                                                   
Port    ( INPUT     : in   std_logic_vector (NUMBITS-1 downto 0);                
          OUTPUT    : out  std_logic_vector (NUMBITS-1 downto 0);                
          SHIFT_CNT : in   integer range 0 to numbits-1                 
        );  

and let the tools figure it out for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I think in case BITWIDTH is not 2 power, the first declaration is not suitable, second way is better. I did some module with integer/nature type in/out but my colleague did not accept. So any problem with this? Is fix-sized obtained after synthesis? –  Khanh Oct 8 '12 at 14:50

When I was using the method mentioned by Khan, I encountered rounding errors. So I wrote my own versions, that are immune to rounding errors and can, in principle handle more than 32 bit. You can substitute the type of L with any Type that has a logical shift left operator.

Most of the time you want to use log2ceil which is the amount of bits required to store the given number, while log2floor can be more described as the highest bit set.

In most cases those functions are fine for synthesis as they are used for generating constants. So no hardware is inferred for them.

function log2ceil (L: POSITIVE) return NATURAL is
    variable i, bitCount : natural;
begin
    i := L-1;
    bitCount:=0;
    while (i > 0) loop
        bitCount := bitCount + 1;
        i:=srlInteger(i,1);
    end loop;
    return bitCount;
end log2ceil;

function log2floor (L: POSITIVE) return NATURAL is
    variable i, bitCount : natural;
begin
    i := L;
    bitCount:=0;
    while (i > 1) loop
        bitCount := bitCount + 1;
        i:=srlInteger(i,1);
    end loop;
    return bitCount;
end log2floor;

function srlInteger(arg: integer; s:natural) return integer is
begin
    return to_integer(SHIFT_RIGHT(to_UNSIGNED(ARG,32), s));
end srlInteger;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.