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I am looking at the Android notepad application sample code in <path_to_SDK>/samples/android-16/NotePad/src/com/example/android/notepad.

I was wondering if anyone could explain to me why the following code is needed in NotepadProvider.java?

// Creates a new projection map instance. The map returns a column name
// given a string. The two are usually equal.
sNotesProjectionMap = new HashMap<String, String>();

// Maps the string "_ID" to the column name "_ID"
sNotesProjectionMap.put(NotePad.Notes._ID, NotePad.Notes._ID);

// Maps "title" to "title"
sNotesProjectionMap.put(NotePad.Notes.COLUMN_NAME_TITLE,NotePad.Notes.COLUMN_NAME_TITLE);

// Maps "note" to "note"
sNotesProjectionMap.put(NotePad.Notes.COLUMN_NAME_NOTE, NotePad.Notes.COLUMN_NAME_NOTE);

// Maps "created" to "created"
sNotesProjectionMap.put(NotePad.Notes.COLUMN_NAME_CREATE_DATE, NotePad.Notes.COLUMN_NAME_CREATE_DATE);

// Maps "modified" to "modified"
sNotesProjectionMap.put(
        NotePad.Notes.COLUMN_NAME_MODIFICATION_DATE,
        NotePad.Notes.COLUMN_NAME_MODIFICATION_DATE)

I notice the projection map is used later in the query() method:

...
SQLiteQueryBuilder qb = new SQLiteQueryBuilder();
qb.setTables(NotePad.Notes.TABLE_NAME);

/**
 * Choose the projection and adjust the "where" clause based on URI pattern-matching.
 */
switch (sUriMatcher.match(uri)) {
    // If the incoming URI is for notes, chooses the Notes projection
    case NOTES:
    qb.setProjectionMap(sNotesProjectionMap);
    break;
...

Why is this projection map needed?

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1  
The documentation for SQLiteQueryBuilder.setProjectionMap() has a good explanation. –  Luksprog Oct 5 '12 at 18:46
    
Thanks. Maybe my question wasn't clear enough - I understand what a projection map is, but I was wondering what the point of having a projection map that only contains mappings that have identical key and values (I would understand if at least one of the mappings had a different key, value pair). –  Mewzer Oct 8 '12 at 13:28
1  
That is a sample application, one that should be an example of API use and good practices using those APIs, that is way they probably use a projection map. For example, if I remember right, the Shelves application made by one of the google engineers is using a projection map in its ContentProvider and that projection map isn't just a simple mapping with identical key-value pairs. –  Luksprog Oct 9 '12 at 7:55
    
Thanks - if you make your comment into an answer then I'll accept it. –  Mewzer Oct 9 '12 at 9:47
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The Notepad application from the SDK demos is a sample application, one that should be an example of API use and good practices using those APIs, that is way they probably use a projection map. Although the Notepad sample doesn't really need a projection map the use of one is a good showcase for more complex cases when one is needed. For example, if I remember right, the Shelves application written by one of the google engineers is using a projection map in its ContentProvider and that projection map isn't just a simple mapping with identical key-value pairs.

I've also added a link to the documentation of the method SQLiteQueryBuilder.setProjection which has some details on why you would need a projection map.

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Would you have an explanation for the why using a projection map? I am not sure to understand the point of using another name between the query and the column names? –  Paul Nov 4 '13 at 23:02
1  
@Paul That projection map is required when you used a SQLiteQueryBuilder for more advanced scenarios than a very simple query. For example, maybe you want to make an alias between the current column names of a sqlite table and some arbitrary names you want in your app(check the AS sqlite keyword sqlite.org/syntaxdiagrams.html#result-column). Also in join queries you may need different names if your tables have columns with the same name(most commonly, two tables that each have an _id column). –  Luksprog Nov 5 '13 at 12:31
    
OK thanks Luksprog –  Paul Nov 5 '13 at 16:54
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