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#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class SomeClass {
public:
    bool someArray[4][4]={{0,0,0,0},{0,0,0,0}};
};

int main()
{
     SomeClass super;
     super.someArray={{1,1,1,0},{1,0,0,1}};  //This goes red, indicates a mistake. How do i properly fill it?

    for (int i=0;i<4;i++){
        for (int j=0;j<4;j++){
           cout<<super.someArray[i][j];
        }
        cout<<endl;
    }
return 0;
}

Please see the comments in the code above. By the way: super.someArray[4][4]={{1,1,1,0},{1,0,0,1}}; doesn't work either and it probably shouldn't.

share|improve this question
    
By "this goes red", what do you mean? –  Zyx 2000 Oct 5 '12 at 17:15
    
well i mean, that the IDE (Qt Creator) indicates an error. When i try to compile it it says: assigning to an array from an initializer list. –  user1723614 Oct 5 '12 at 17:17
    
There appears to be a second error (the other array initialization). If you comment out the one indicated red line, does the code compile and run? –  nobar Oct 5 '12 at 17:29
    
Yes, compiles and runs smoothly. –  user1723614 Oct 5 '12 at 17:33
    
I think neither initialization is valid in old C++. The second initialization should work if you have a compiler that supports C++11. One reason the first one is invalid is because you can't initialize member data at its point of declaration unless it is "static const". Non-const member data should be initialized in constructors. –  nobar Oct 5 '12 at 17:40

3 Answers 3

  1. You probably mean to use bool someArray[2][4] (i.e, an array with two elements that contains arrays with four boolean elements).

  2. You can't assign one array into another in C++; you'll need to copy the individual elements. I.e., something like:

    super.someArray[0][0] = 1; super.someArray[0][1] = 1; super.someArray[0][2] = 1; super.someArray[0][3] = 0; super.someArray[1][0] = 1; super.someArray[1][1] = 0; super.someArray[1][2] = 0; super.someArray[1][3] = 1;

(If you have some source for your data, you could use a loop of course.)

share|improve this answer
    
Even if he doesn't have a source for the data, he can create one (a local array), thus making the code much more readable. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 5 '12 at 17:18
    
@BenjaminLindley Agreed. Of course, the someArray variable should probably be getting initialized in a constructor while he's at it. –  Edward Loper Oct 5 '12 at 17:22
    
You can use an initialization in C or C++, but it must be part of the delclaration. int myarray[3][3] = {{1,2,3},{4,5,6},{7,8,9}}; is valid, for example. –  CaptainMurphy Oct 5 '12 at 17:25
    
Could you please tell more about it? About how to create a local source of data, or maybe where i can read about it? Actually the best would be if it would get the data from an external text file for example. –  user1723614 Oct 5 '12 at 17:25

The following worked for me using the GNU compiler. Notice that I replaced your raw array with std::tr1::array. This class is more flexible with respect to assigning entire arrays (as opposed to just initializing arrays from literals).

#include <iostream>
#include <tr1/array>
using namespace std;
using namespace tr1;
typedef array<array<bool,4>,4> array4x4;

class SomeClass {
public:
    array4x4 someArray;
    SomeClass() : someArray((array4x4){{{{0,0,0,0}},{{0,0,0,0}}}}) {}
};

int main()
{
     SomeClass super;
     super.someArray=(array4x4){{{{1,1,1,0}},{{1,0,0,1}}}};  //Now works

    for (int i=0;i<4;i++){
        for (int j=0;j<4;j++){
           cout<<super.someArray[i][j];
        }
        cout<<endl;
    }
return 0;
}

However, the following approach is a bit closer to where you started, and demonstrates some of the things suggested in other comments...

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
using namespace std;

class SomeClass {
public:
    bool someArray[4][4];
    SomeClass()
       {
       bool temp[4][4] = {{0,0,0,0},{0,0,0,0},{0,0,0,0},{0,0,0,0}};
       for ( int j=0; j<4; j++ ) for ( int i=0; i<4; i++ ) someArray[j][i] = temp[j][i];
       }
};

int main()
{
     SomeClass super;
       bool temp[4][4] = {{1,1,1,0},{1,0,0,1}}; // a local source of data
       for ( int j=0; j<4; j++ ) for ( int i=0; i<4; i++ ) super.someArray[j][i] = temp[j][i];

    for (int i=0;i<4;i++){
        for (int j=0;j<4;j++){
           cout<<super.someArray[i][j];
        }
        cout<<endl;
    }
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Also, notice the double bracketing {{}} used to initialize std::tr1::array. I don't know what this is called, but it seems to be required in order to make this kind of initialization (at least with some compilers). I also don't know that this syntax is standard-compliant. –  nobar Oct 5 '12 at 18:33
    
by the new standart, double bracketing is not needed. only non-conforming compilers need that. –  Dani Oct 5 '12 at 18:35
    
The second approach is standard-compliant and easy to understand, but I think it is quite a bit more error-prone. There are multiple places where you could crash the program by using the wrong value for an array size. –  nobar Oct 5 '12 at 18:35
super.someArray[4][4]={{1,1,1,0},{1,0,0,1}};

The line above just needs to be:

super.someArray[4][4]={1,1,1,0,1,0,0,1};

Explaination: it will automatically go the next section of the array. If you think of it as a table, once the first row is filled up, it will start declaring it for the next row.

So if you wrote:

super.someArray[4][4]={1,1,1,1,1}; 

it would set:

someArray[0][0] 
someArray[0][1] 
someArray[0][2] 
someArray[0][3] 
someArray[1][0] 

all equal to 1.

(I might have the numbers switched so it could be x and y places are changed, I can't recall for c++)

share|improve this answer
    
Well...it gives an error as well. –  user1723614 Oct 5 '12 at 21:36

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