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if I've got a

While not terminated do
begin
     doStuff;

end

loop in the execute method of a Delphi XE2 thread, and I want to not make it bogart all my flops.

What should I call,

in Delphi 7, it was easy, I'd call Sleep(X) where X was inversely proportional to how interesting I thought the thread was.

But now, I've got

SpinWait(X);

Which calls YieldProcessor X number of times

and

Yield;

which calls the windows function "SwitchToThread".

Should I use any of these or should I just set the priority of the thread?

share|improve this question
    
What's wrong with waiting for an event? In that case the thread can be put to sleep till the event is signalled. –  LU RD Oct 5 '12 at 17:34
2  
You have to use a proper wait for a sync object. Sleep is never the answer. Never. Ever. –  David Heffernan Oct 5 '12 at 17:45
    
@DavidHeffernan truer words rarely spoken. –  Peter Turner Oct 5 '12 at 17:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

SpinWait wastes time without giving up the processor. It's like Sleep, but without yielding control to any other threads during the delay. If you don't have multiple cores, then it's a total waste because no other thread can do anything while you're spinning. As far as I can tell, Yield is analogous to Sleep(0), except that if there is no other thread ready to run, then the calling thread just continues immediately.

Neither of those sounds like what you want if you know that your thread really has nothing else to do.

The best solution would be to find or establish some waitable object (like a semaphore, event, or process handle) that you could wait to become signaled. Then you wouldn't have to bother waking up at all, just so you can poll your status and go to sleep again.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the pointers. I'm doing something quick and dirty. The process running here isn't a long-lived background thread. I'm trying to repair this "threadpool.pas" unit that is more like a "deadpool.pas" made buy a fella who recently left our company, he had a mixture of yields, windows event handles and tthreadedqueues. I'll put the legit delphi events back in once I get things running. –  Peter Turner Oct 5 '12 at 17:48
    
The OS already provides a thread pool. So does the much-lauded OmniThreadLibrary. Instead of spending time figuring out how to repair something that's broken, you could spend it switching to something already known to work. –  Rob Kennedy Oct 5 '12 at 18:05
    
@Peter: If you're trying to replace a bad thread pool, is there any way you could redo the interface as a wrapper around OTL? –  Mason Wheeler Oct 5 '12 at 18:05
    
@Mason I'll try for the next release. But this is one of the "needed to be done last week things." at least the unit is generic and short enough to be completely scrapped and replaced. –  Peter Turner Oct 5 '12 at 18:11
    
Delphi threadpool trivial. TObjectQueue, Tsemaphore, TcriticalSection and some TThreads. It's like 30-40 lines. –  Martin James Oct 5 '12 at 18:29

Threadpool example:

unit ThreadPool;

    interface

    uses
      Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
      Dialogs, StdCtrls, contnrs, syncobjs;


    type

    TpooledTask=class(TObject)
    private
      FonComplete:TNotifyEvent;
    protected
      Fparam:TObject;
      procedure execute; virtual; abstract;
    public
      constructor create(onComplete:TNotifyEvent;param:TObject);
    end;

    TThreadPool=class(TObjectQueue)
    private
      access:TcriticalSection;
      taskCounter:THandle;
      threadCount:integer;
    public
      constructor create(initThreads:integer);
      procedure addTask(aTask:TpooledTask);
    end;

    TpoolThread=class(Tthread)
    private
      FmyPool:TThreadPool;
    protected
      procedure Execute; override;
    public
      constructor create(pool:TThreadPool);
    end;

    implementation

    { TpooledTask }

    constructor TpooledTask.create(onComplete: TNotifyEvent; param: TObject);
    begin
      FonComplete:=onComplete;
      Fparam:=param;
    end;

    { TThreadPool }

    procedure TThreadPool.addTask(aTask: TpooledTask);
    begin
      access.acquire;
      try
        push(aTask);
      finally
        access.release;
      end;
      releaseSemaphore(taskCounter,1,nil); // release one unit to semaphore
    end;

    constructor TThreadPool.create(initThreads: integer);
    begin
      inherited create;
      access:=TcriticalSection.create;
      taskCounter:=createSemaphore(nil,0,maxInt,'');
      while(threadCount<initThreads) do
      begin
        TpoolThread.create(self);
        inc(threadCount);
      end;
    end;

    { TpoolThread }

    constructor TpoolThread.create(pool: TThreadPool);
    begin
      inherited create(true);
      FmyPool:=pool;
      FreeOnTerminate:=true;
      resume;
    end;

    procedure TpoolThread.execute;
    var thisTask:TpooledTask;
    begin
      while (WAIT_OBJECT_0=waitForSingleObject(FmyPool.taskCounter,INFINITE)) do
      begin
        FmyPool.access.acquire;
        try
          thisTask:=TpooledTask(FmyPool.pop);
        finally
          FmyPool.access.release;
        end;
        thisTask.execute;
        if assigned(thisTask.FonComplete) then thisTask.FonComplete(thisTask);
      end;
    end;

    end.
share|improve this answer
    
Holy smokes, that looks like exactly the same code, he must have gotten it off the web after all! –  Peter Turner Oct 5 '12 at 18:49
    
Wot? My threadpool is a badpool?? <g> –  Martin James Oct 5 '12 at 18:52
    
Well, probably not, I'm going to give this a shot an see what comes of it. He has some TThreadManager in between. It's just a few things that are the same. –  Peter Turner Oct 5 '12 at 18:54
    
Been using basically the same design since D3. OK, this cutdown version has no built-in exceptinon traps etc, but I've never had a failure. –  Martin James Oct 5 '12 at 18:54
1  
'TThreadManager' - micromanaging threads is err.. 'very difficult' and prone to 'unusual and unexpected deviations from the required functionality'. –  Martin James Oct 5 '12 at 18:56

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