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I'm an iOS dev looking into some security aspects of a native iPhone app that loads local html pages into a UIWebView (that's the iOS class that give browsers functionality to a native app).

If the app loads a local html file and that file contains a link to an external html file then is it possible for that external file to download a file to the client (another html file or a javascript file)? My knowledge of html/javascript isn't detailed enough in this area.

E.g. If A.html is file physically present on the phone and A.html contains a href to B.html where B.html is on a server then is it possible for B.html (using whatever means) to move a file (C.html or D.js etc.) from the server onto the device?

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I'm not sure what you mean, could you give more details? Are you talking about JavaScript XMLHttpRequests? –  bfavaretto Oct 5 '12 at 17:26
    
If A.html is file physically present on the phone and A.html contains a href to B.html where B.html is on a server then is it possible for B.html (using whatever means) to move a file (C.html or D.js etc.) from the server onto the device? –  Mr H Oct 5 '12 at 17:29
    
Well, if you click on the B-link, the WebView will display B.html. So it moved itself to the device, right? –  amadeus Oct 5 '12 at 17:34
    
If B.html is loaded on your UIWebView, it can load other files from the same domain with JavaScript, and store the file contents in a variable. I don't know much about iOS development, but if UIWebView provides an interface to js, and is able to write to the device's filesystem, then yes, it should be possible. –  bfavaretto Oct 5 '12 at 17:37

1 Answer 1

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What you probably mean is : are HTML pages able to download (and potentially execute or overwrite) content/code on the device? I'm just going to assume that in the following.

  • First, the browser isn't supposed to be able to download anything without the user consent. That's especially true on iOS, where the browser actually can't download anything at all. (Well, you can actually download images by long-pressing on them, but they are only going to go to the Photo Roll. Any other download will just fail.)

  • HTML pages (and JavaScript, images, ...) are of course downloaded to the device before the browser or UIWebView displays them, but they can't access anything on the filesystem.

  • What's more, due to the same-origin policy, a web page cannot access anything that's outside of its domain (cross-origin requests allow this, but they require the server to send a particular header).

    Say your page is on http://mywebsite.com : you can't make a request to http://blah.org if it's not setup properly, or even (much more dangerous) to file:///etc/passwd (which you have no way to setup properly).

  • I'm not sure about local pages, but (at least on Chrome on the desktop) local web pages cannot download anything at all.

Of course, all of these are the expected behavior.

There have been cases of vulnerabilities (this one for instance) where Safari allows unprivileged access to the filesystem, but in most cases they have been patched quickly by Apple and you won't have to (and are not supposed to if you want to avoid unnecessary headaches) worry about them.

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