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Json.Net typically serializes a Dictionary<k,v> into a collection;

"MyDict": {
  "Apples": {
    "Taste": 1341181398,
    "Title": "Granny Smith",
  },
  "Oranges": {
    "Taste": 9999999999,
    "Title": "Coxes Pippin",
  },
 }

Which is great. And from looking around on SO it seems to be what most people want. However, in this particular case, I want to serialize between my Dictionary<k,v> and the Array format instead;

"MyDict": [
    "k": "Apples",
    "v": {
        "Taste": 1341181398,
        "Title": "Granny Smith",
    }
  },
    "k:": "Oranges",
    "v:": {
        "Taste": 9999999999,
        "Title": "Coxes Pippin",
    }
  },
]

Is there an easy way to do this with my existing field type? Is there an attribute I can annotate for instance?

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4 Answers 4

Another way to accomplish this is to use a custom ContractResolver. That way you do not have to subclass Dictionary<K,V> nor apply a transform each time you serialize, as suggested in other answers.

The following resolver will cause ALL dictionaries to be serialized as an array of objects with "Key" and "Value" properties:

class DictionaryAsArrayResolver : DefaultContractResolver
{
    protected override JsonContract CreateContract(Type objectType)
    {
        if (objectType.GetInterfaces().Any(i => i == typeof(IDictionary) || 
            (i.IsGenericType && 
             i.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IDictionary<,>))))
        {
            return base.CreateArrayContract(objectType);
        }

        return base.CreateContract(objectType);
    }
}

To use the resolver, add it to your JsonSerializerSettings, then pass the settings to JsonConvert.SerializeObject() like this:

JsonSerializerSettings settings = new JsonSerializerSettings();
settings.ContractResolver = new DictionaryAsArrayResolver();

string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(obj, settings);

Here is a working demo.

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Thank you, thank you, thank you. Such an easier solution to implement than subclassing or writing a custom type converter. –  beterthanlife Mar 25 at 10:40
    
@beterthanlife I'm glad you found my answer useful! –  Brian Rogers Mar 25 at 14:05

For this example, I'll use the dictonary:

var myDict = new Dictionary<string,string>() { 
    {"a","123"}, 
    {"b","234"}, 
    {"c","345"} 
};

which serializes (with Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.SerializeObject(myDict)) to:

{"a":"123","b":"234","c":"345"}

You could do a transform using LINQ to create an anonymous object, and serialize that:

 var myDictTransformed = from key in myDict.Keys
                         select new { k = key, v = myDict[key] };

Or you could use a real object

class MyDictEntry 
{
    public string k { get; set; }
    public string v { get; set; }
}

and either the above or the alternative LINQ syntax:

var myDictTransformed = myDict.Keys.AsEnumerable()
                        .Select(key => new MyDictEntry{ 
                            k = key, 
                            v = myDict[key] 
                        });

Either way, this serializes to:

[
  {"k":"a", "v":"123"},
  {"k":"b", "v":"234"},
  {"k":"c", "v":"345"}
]

.NET Fiddle link: https://dotnetfiddle.net/LhisVW

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gregmac's answer was helpful, but didn't quite work. The following is the same idea... without the puns.

var dictionaryTransformed = dictionary.Select(item => item.Key).Select(i => 
                        new {Key = i, Value = dictionary[i] });

or of course

var dictionaryTransformed = dictionary.Select(item => 
                        new {item.Key, Value = dictionary[item.Key] });

Then to json

var json = (new JavaScriptSerializer()).Serialize( 
                        new { Container = dictionaryTransformed.ToArray() } )
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up vote 8 down vote accepted

Ah, it turns out this is as straightforward as I'd hoped. My Dictionary<k,v> is subclassed already and I found that I can annotate it with [JsonArrayAttribute]. That gives me exactly the format I need;

"MyDict": [
  {
    "Key": "Apples",
    "Value": {
        "Taste": 1341181398,
        "Title": "Granny Smith",
    }
  },
  {
    "Key:": "Oranges",
    "Value:": {
        "Taste": 9999999999,
        "Title": "Coxes Pippin",
    }
  },
]
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