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I'm a PHP/Rails developer and have inherited an ASP.NET application (and its maintenance). So I have a few simple questions.

1.) What's the makeup of a typical rendered(compiled?) HTML page in ASP.NET. That is, when a request is made what happens from the initial request to the time the HTML is displayed in the browser? I'm assuming some templates are combined and finally rendered but I'd like a more in-depth answer.

2.) I've been asked to remove a link from a Login form which is an aspx page. Looking at the aspx page itself it has an inherit statement, a link to the codebehind file, and links some other resources. Where do I actually remove the link from the Login page/template at? I've so far been unable to find exactly where the link is written so that I can remove it or comment it out.

Thank you!

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check this link: stackoverflow.com/questions/352222/… –  codingbiz Oct 5 '12 at 17:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That is, when a request is made what happens from the initial request to the time the HTML is displayed in the browser?

I'd start learning about the ASP.Net Page Life Cycle.

I've so far been unable to find exactly where the link is written so that I can remove it or comment it out.

I wouldn't do anything until you have at least a decent grasp of how ASP.Net works. It would be good to run through a few tutorials. ASP.Net has a nice Get Started section.

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Thank you for the response! I'll begin looking at those and post back with further questions. –  Caley Woods Oct 5 '12 at 17:51
1  
I agree with this answer. The OP must get a firm grasp of what is going on or else he/she will have many many more questions: "How to add a button", "How to remove a link", "How to bind to a data control", ... well, you know. –  Jeremy Oct 5 '12 at 17:51
    
@seth flowers can you shed some light on how the lifecycle applies to something like requesting this Login.aspx page? I've gisted the page content: gist.github.com/efd5d54f08ee4013a85b According to the documentation it looks like the .master file will be applied first. –  Caley Woods Oct 5 '12 at 18:05
    
Understanding the page lifecycle helps to understand what code is executing for the page. Specifically, it will give you a firmer grasp of what events are handled by your Login.aspx page, your Default.master, your Login.ascx user control, and any other controls, and in what order. The main takeaway is that you should probably run through a few tutorials. –  seth flowers Oct 5 '12 at 18:12
    
@sethflowers I don't actually see the codebehind files in the directory. Are the codebehind files available from the IIS virtual directory where the app is running (i'm browsing) or do I need to go look at the actual project? –  Caley Woods Oct 5 '12 at 18:17
What's the makeup of a typical rendered(compiled?)

To give you a very simple instructions (trying) to help you fast understand it:

  1. There is a page with the aspx tags, the asp.net is running the code behind and fill this tags with data.
  2. After the filling with data on code behind, the asp.net is "running" the full page and if you have <% %> inside the aspx page, addition code runs that exist inside that.

This is a simple example:

public partial class Dokimes_StackOverFlow_Diafora : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    public string cRenderMeAlso = "test";

    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        txtText.Text = "One Test";        
    }
}

<form id="form1" runat="server">
     This will fill when the page is prepared
     <asp:Literal runat="server" ID="txtText"></asp:Literal>
     <br />
     This will be render as the page reads out to send it to the browser
     as php do
     <%=cRenderMeAlso%>
</form>

Now in the place of the Literal control, you can have a full custom render control, that maybe a new complex part of a page with his elements and render.

Each page, master page, user control have a cycle of calls to help first pass all from Init() and prepare them, then pass all from Load(), and the other stage, giving the ability to initialize them in parallel - together.

Now, on PostBack the page have been keep some information's on ViewState that are posted together with the rest post data, and the Code behind use all that data to fill the controls. Also its fires on code behind any click event you have initialize on buttons and you can run some code there to do your work.

 I've been asked to remove a link from a Login form 

if you can not find that link is maybe on the standard login form that asp.net gives, the solution to that is to render the full template of the form, and remove it from there - but because there is the case to break the Login form, is better to not remove it and just hide it - because if you remove it and the code behind ask for it, it will throw an error - I mean for the standard asp.net forms login code that is part of the asp.net.

So if this is the case, render the login control as template (from design mode, do that on properties), see the link you search and ether make on code behind Link.Visible = false, ether remove it and delete on code behind all the reference on it.

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Thank you! This combined with the Lifecyle documentation that Seth provided should be helpful. –  Caley Woods Oct 5 '12 at 18:10

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