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I have this sqlite3 table used in an iOS 6 app for iPad:

CREATE TABLE notes(id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, note TEXT, noteDate TEXT, wasUploaded INTEGER);

from the sqlite3 command line this query works:

sqlite> Select `id`,`note`,`noteDate`,`wasUploaded` FROM `notes` WHERE `wasUploaded`=0;

1|Well|2012-10-04 22:46:23|0

On iOS iPad 6.0 Simulator each of these queries returns the exact same data as above:

const char *sqlStatement = "Select `id`,`note`,`noteDate`,`wasUploaded` FROM `notes` WHERE `id`=1";

const char *sqlStatement = "Select `id`,`note`,`noteDate`,`wasUploaded` FROM `notes` WHERE `note`='Well'";

const char *sqlStatement = "Select `id`,`note`,`noteDate`,`wasUploaded` FROM `notes` WHERE `noteDate`='2012-10-04 22:46:23'";

But this query which worked fine on the command line now returns no data:

const char *sqlStatement = "Select `id`,`note`,`noteDate`,`wasUploaded` FROM `notes` WHERE `wasUploaded`=0";

Has me baffled. Why is that last query not working? Do I need to make that column an index or something? The other two non-indexed columns work but not this.

No errors. The last query that returns no data gives a normal return code of 101 (sqlite3_step() has finished executing) and a query without the where clause returns the same data as for the other three queries.

Edit: here is the complete code

- (NSString *)getNotesToBeUploaded {
sqlite3 *stuDb;
NSString *thisNote;
NSMutableString *notes = [[NSMutableString alloc]init];

if (self.filePath == @"empty") {
    [self setDatabaseFilePath];
}

if (sqlite3_open([self.filePath UTF8String], &stuDb) == SQLITE_OK)
{
    // this is the query line that get changed to show stackoverflow the different results:
    const char *sqlStatement = "Select `id`,`note`,`noteDate` FROM notes WHERE `wasUploaded`=0";
    sqlite3_stmt *compiledStatement;
    int nResult = sqlite3_prepare_v2(stuDb, sqlStatement, -1, &compiledStatement, NULL);
    if ( nResult == SQLITE_OK)
    {
        int nret; // diagnostic used to watch return vaues when single stepping
        while ((nret = sqlite3_step(compiledStatement)) == SQLITE_ROW)
        {
            int id =  sqlite3_column_int(compiledStatement, 0);
            const unsigned char *note =  sqlite3_column_text(compiledStatement, 1);
            const unsigned char *noteDate =  sqlite3_column_text(compiledStatement, 2);
            int wu =  sqlite3_column_int(compiledStatement, 4);
            if (strlen((const char *)note) > 0 && strlen((const char *)noteDate) > 0)
            {
                thisNote = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d,%s,%s,%d\n",id, noteDate, note, wu];
                [notes appendString:thisNote];
            }
        }
    } else {
        sqlite3_finalize(compiledStatement);// prevent small memory leaks
        sqlite3_close(stuDb);
        thisNote =
        [NSString stringWithFormat:@"prepare failed with status:%d in %s at line %d path was %@,0,0\n",nResult,__FILE__,__LINE__,self.filePath];
        [notes appendString:thisNote];
        [notes appendString:@"\n"];
        return (NSString *)notes;
    }
    sqlite3_finalize(compiledStatement);
    sqlite3_close(stuDb);
}
share|improve this question
    
Do you get any errors while executing the query? –  ohr Oct 5 '12 at 18:05
    
When you omit the WHERE clause, what happens then? –  Philip Oct 5 '12 at 18:07
    
Thanks I have edited the question to answer your questions –  sdjuan Oct 5 '12 at 18:10
    
Is there any difference in typeof(wasUploaded) for this record? –  CL. Oct 5 '12 at 18:16
1  
Glad to know it was something simple. Didn't mean to drag you through broken glass on this... :) –  Rob Oct 5 '12 at 19:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Are you checking the return codes from your sqlite3 calls? And, if you're not getting SQLITE_OK or SQLITE_ROW, as appropriate, you should check the sqlite3_errmsg results to diagnose what's going on. You really should share your code if you want us to help you. But the most common problems in the first-time iOS SQLite apps are

  • Failing to include the database in your app's bundle. Check your Target settings and make sure you've included the database in the Build Phases. You can also confirm this by looking at your app's bundle in the simulator in the ~/Library/Application Support/iPhone Simulator folder. If you want to do that, you may want to unhide your ~/Library folder if you haven't by typing in chflags no hidden ~/Library in the Terminal command line interface.

  • If you're planning on updating your database from the app, failing to first copy the database from the bundle to the Documents folder before you try to start using it.

  • Using sqlite3_open and interpreting a successful return code as evidence that the database was opened successfully ... but if it didn't find the database, the sqlite3_open function annoyingly will create a new blank database ... I always suggest that people use sqlite3_open_v2 instead, in which you can omit the parameter to create a blank database if it's not found if that's not what you want.

Certainly, there can be a ton of code-related issues (order that the functions are called, failing to check return codes, etc.), too. It's impossible to comment further without seeing the code.

And I feel obliged to share my final SQLite programming advice that it's worth checking out FMDB Objective-C SQLite wrapper library, which greatly simplifies SQLite programming in iOS.


Update:

Having looked at your code, it looks fine. I just ran it (only tweaked to just NSLog rather than appending notes):

- (void)test2
{
    sqlite3 *stuDb;
    NSString *documentsDirectory = [NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDocumentDirectory, NSUserDomainMask, YES) objectAtIndex:0];
    NSString *databaseName = [documentsDirectory stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"test.db"];

    if (sqlite3_open([databaseName UTF8String], &stuDb) == SQLITE_OK)
    {
        // this is the query line that get changed to show stackoverflow the different results:
        const char *sqlStatement = "Select `id`,`note`,`noteDate` FROM notes WHERE `wasUploaded`=0";
        sqlite3_stmt *compiledStatement;
        int nResult = sqlite3_prepare_v2(stuDb, sqlStatement, -1, &compiledStatement, NULL);
        if ( nResult == SQLITE_OK)
        {
            int nret; // diagnostic used to watch return vaues when single stepping
            while ((nret = sqlite3_step(compiledStatement)) == SQLITE_ROW)
            {
                int id =  sqlite3_column_int(compiledStatement, 0);
                const unsigned char *note =  sqlite3_column_text(compiledStatement, 1);
                const unsigned char *noteDate =  sqlite3_column_text(compiledStatement, 2);
                int wu =  sqlite3_column_int(compiledStatement, 4);
                if (strlen((const char *)note) > 0 && strlen((const char *)noteDate) > 0)
                {
                    // thisNote = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d,%s,%s,%d\n",id, noteDate, note, wu];
                    // [notes appendString:thisNote];
                    NSLog(@"%d,%s,%s,%d\n",id, noteDate, note, wu);
                }
            }
        } else {
            //sqlite3_finalize(compiledStatement);// prevent small memory leaks, not needed if the prepare failed
            sqlite3_close(stuDb);
            NSLog(@"prepare failed with error %s", sqlite3_errmsg(stuDb));
            return;
        }
        sqlite3_finalize(compiledStatement);
        sqlite3_close(stuDb);
    }
}

And I got results:

2012-10-05 15:44:06.075 test8[1574:c07] 1,2012-10-05 19:43:37,ABC,0
2012-10-05 15:44:06.076 test8[1574:c07] 2,2012-10-05 19:43:46,XYZ,0

So the problem must be in the database itself. Judging from your last comment, it sounds like rebuilding the database did it for you. That's great.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I am hesitant to point this out, but your response seems to be a cut and paste 'canned response' of which no part is relevant to this question other than seeking for more code. In fact the question answers already all the other things you mention, it shows the codes returned and also shows that some queries work already. After I post an expanded version I hope you will be able to help. –  sdjuan Oct 5 '12 at 18:44
    
I'm sorry you didn't find it helpful. If it feels canned (even though I just typed it out), it's because in the absence of code, we are limited to broad generalizations and these are the sorts of problems new sqlite programmers encounter. I'm glad to hear that you've confirmed that your sqlite3_step is returning SQLITE_ROW and that there is no sqlite3_errmsg to examine. Good luck. –  Rob Oct 5 '12 at 18:54
    
OK then here's ALL the code. –  sdjuan Oct 5 '12 at 18:58
    
Are you willing to upload the database somewhere and we can check it out? –  Rob Oct 5 '12 at 19:02
1  
yep. That's why it had me baffled. It was soooo simple and should have just worked. Thanks. –  sdjuan Oct 5 '12 at 19:54

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