Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a viewmodel that contains a pair of DateTime? objects - nullable DateTimes.

private DateTime? _xmitdtFrom;
public DateTime? xmitdtFrom
{
    get { return this._xmitdtFrom; }
    set
    {
        this._xmitdtFrom = value;
        notifyPropertyChanged("xmitdtFrom");
    }
}

private DateTime? _xmitdtTo;
public DateTime? xmitdtTo
{
    get { return this._xmitdtTo; }
    set
    {
        this._xmitdtTo = value;
        notifyPropertyChanged("xmitdtTo");
    }
}

The xmitdtFrom date cannot be greater than the xmitdtFrom date, the xmitdtTo date cannot be before the xmitdtFrom date, and neither the xmitdtTo date not the xmitdtFrom can be after today.

So, in the markup I have this:

<Label Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="1">
    From:
</Label>
<DatePicker Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="2" 
        SelectedDate="{Binding xmitdtFrom, Mode=TwoWay}"
        DisplayDateEnd="{Binding xmitdtTo}"
        />
<Label Grid.Row="2" Grid.Column="1">
    Through:
</Label>
<DatePicker Grid.Row="2" Grid.Column="2"
        SelectedDate="{Binding xmitdtTo, Mode=TwoWay}"
        DisplayDateStart="{Binding xmitdtFrom}"
        DisplayDateEnd="{x:Static sys:DateTime.Now}"
        />

And this works fine, unless xmitdtTo is null - in which case xmitdtFrom is unrestricted, which is a problem.

What I want is to set DisplayDateEnd for the xmitdtFrom to the xmitdtTo, if it's not null, or to DateTime.Now, if it is.

And I'm wondering what might be the cleanest way of accomplishing this.

share|improve this question
    
You should really implement your date validation in your ViewModel with IDataErrorInfo, and not have the UI try to accomplish it by enabling/disabling date ranges. Afterall, I don't think anything stops a user from copying/pasting a date into the Date box either. –  Rachel Oct 5 '12 at 18:56
    
Setting DisplayDateEnd="{x:Static sys:DateTime.Now}" in the xaml will give you a potential bug when a user has the app open over the midnight cutoff, making it impossible for someone to select the new day even if it's a valid choice. This is a pretty unlikely occurrance, depending on your apps use, but I thought I'd point it out as it reinforces Rachel's point above. –  Jacob Proffitt Oct 5 '12 at 19:02
    
I feel very strongly that it's a better UI design to disable options that the user is not allowed to select, rather than to allow him to select something, and then tell him he's wrong, after. Validation is still necessary, in case the user types a date rather than selecting one, but allowing invalid dates to be active in the calendar is a really bad idea. –  Jeff Dege Oct 6 '12 at 2:46
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I decided to go with another approach entirely.

Instead of messing about with the viewmodel, I created an IfNullConverter, that when used in a binding would pass the bound object, if it was not null, or would pass its ConversionParameter, if it was.

And I used that in binding the from date's DisplayDateEnd - with xmitDTTo as the bound property, and DateTime.Now as the ConversionParameter.

Solves the problem cleanly, entirely within the UI (and this is a UI problem, not a data problem, so I'd prefer a solution that doesn't pollute the viewmodel). And it creates a general purpose functionality, that will be available to use in other similar circumstances.

The converter:

public class IfNullConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        if (value == null)
            return parameter;
        else
            return value;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

The binding:

<DatePicker Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="2" 
    SelectedDate="{Binding Path=xmitdtFrom, Mode=TwoWay}"
    DisplayDateEnd="{Binding xmitdtThrough, Converter={StaticResource ifNullConverter}, ConverterParameter={x:Static sys:DateTime.Now}}"
    />
share|improve this answer
add comment

Do you ever really need xmitdtTo to be null? I mean, you're not getting or preserving important data when it's null, right? If that's the case, then I'd circumvent the whole problem by setting _xmitdtTo to today as a default.

private DateTime? _xmitdtTo = DateTime.Today; 

If you need to preserve the data, then you can alter the property, instead, to return today when _xmitdtTo is null.

public DateTime? xmitdtTo   
{   
    get
    {
        if (!_xmitdtTo.HasValue)
            return DateTime.Today;
        return this._xmitdtTo; 
    }  

If you really want to preserve the nullness of your data, then you could create a separate property altogether on your object to assign to the DisplayDateEnd of xmitdtTo:

public DateTime xmitdtDateEnd
{
    get
    {
        return _xmitdtTo ?? DateTime.Today;
    }
}

Don't forget to add a call to notifyPropertyChanged("xmitdtDateEnd") in the xmitdtTo property assignment so it'll update the UI when you change xmitdtTo.

set 
{ 
    this._xmitdtTo = value; 
    notifyPropertyChanged("xmitdtTo"); 
    notifyPropertyChanged("xmitdtDateEnd"); 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Yes. And not only do I need it to be null, I need it to default to being null. –  Jeff Dege Oct 5 '12 at 19:23
    
Updated the answer for options that perserve your nullness of your underlying property. –  Jacob Proffitt Oct 5 '12 at 21:05
    
Just to clarify - this is a selection criteria form. The data is used in building a where clause in a SQL statement. If the xmitdtFrom is not null, I add a "AND xmitdt > '{0}' " to the where clause. The user has to be able to specify limitations on the xmitdt, but he also has to be able to not specify limitations on the xmitddt. –  Jeff Dege Oct 6 '12 at 12:49
    
Then you'll want that last option of having another property for DisplayDateEnd. –  Jacob Proffitt Oct 6 '12 at 17:06
add comment

Maybe you can try adding another property that you can bind to in DisplayDateEnd. Something like this (untested):

    private DateTime? _displayDateEnd;
    public DateTime? DisplayDateEnd
    {
        get { return this._displayDateEnd; }
        set
        {
            this._displayDateEnd = value; 
            notifyPropertyChanged("DisplayDateEnd");
        }

Set the new property's value from xmidtTo:

    private DateTime? _xmitdtTo; 
    public DateTime? xmitdtTo 
    { 
        get { return this._xmitdtTo; }
        set 
        { 
            this._xmitdtTo = value;

            if (_xmitdtTo == null)
                DisplayDateEnd = _xmitdtTo;
            else
                DisplayDateEnd = DateTime.Now();

            notifyPropertyChanged("DisplayDateEnd"); 
            notifyPropertyChanged("xmitdtTo"); 
        } 
    }

Your updated xaml:

<DatePicker ... DisplayDateEnd="{Binding DisplayDateEnd}"/>
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.