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I have found ways of doing this if the variables in the string are simple scalars such as "$foo = 5" using regex. But the issue is what if the variable in the string is: $foo->{bar} which is equal to 5.

So sample string is:

"This is a string with hash value of $foo->{bar}".

How can I expand that out to read:

"This is a string with hash value of 5"

Thanks.

Edit for more explanation:

I have a string literal (I believe? I am not the best at the vocab of this) that is "Lorem Ipsum $foo->{bar} Lorem Ipsum" that I received from some text source. I want to take that string, replace all the variable names with the actual value of the variable in my code.

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I want to make sure I understand. You have a string (not a literal that can be interpolated) that you need to search for the purposes of faking interpolation? –  mkb Oct 5 '12 at 18:24
    
I have a string literal (I believe? I am not the best at the vocab of this) that is "Lorem Ipsum $foo->{bar} Lorem Ipsum" that I received from some text source. I want to take that string, replace all the variable names with the actual value of the variable in my code. –  Eugene K Oct 5 '12 at 18:27
    
So that string is in your source code in double quotes? Then $foo->{bar} will be interpolated in the string. If it is not in your source code in double quotes, then it isn't a literal. –  mkb Oct 5 '12 at 18:30
    
Your deleted solution worked mkb. This is for an internal tool, so the risk involved of running arbitrary code is not that high. However, I do understand this is poor practice and am thinking of something better... –  Eugene K Oct 5 '12 at 18:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you have there is called a "template". As such, you are looking for a templating system.

Assuming those quotes aren't actually in the string, the only template system I know capable of understanding that templating language is String::Interpolate.

$ perl -E'
   use String::Interpolate qw( interpolate );
   my $template = q!This is a string with hash value of $foo->{bar}!;
   local our $foo = { bar => 123 };
   say interpolate($template);
'
This is a string with hash value of 123

If the quotes are part of the string, what you have there is Perl code. As such, you could get what you want by executing the string. This can be done using eval EXPR.

$ perl -E'
   my $template = q!"This is a string with hash value of $foo->{bar}"!;
   my $foo = { bar => 123 };
   my $result = eval($template);
   die $@ if $@;
   say $result;
'
This is a string with hash value of 123

I strongly recommend against this. I'm not particularly found of String::Interpolate either. Template::Toolkit is probably the popular choice for templating system.

$ perl -e'
   use Template qw( );
   my $template = q!This is a string with hash value of [% foo.bar %]!."\n";
   my %vars = ( foo => { bar => 123 } );
   Template->new()->process(\$template, \%vars);
'
This is a string with hash value of 123
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I didn't know of this module. Sweet! –  mkb Oct 5 '12 at 18:39
    
@mkb, It has a pretty weird interface, but it's still completely usable. –  ikegami Oct 5 '12 at 18:40
    
These worked great! –  Eugene K Oct 5 '12 at 20:03

This should work:

$foo->{"bar"} = 5;
printf "This is a string with hash value of $foo->{\"bar\"}]";
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Don't use printf if you're not going to pass variables to be formatted. Also, this isn't the OP problem. –  harleypig Oct 5 '12 at 18:55

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