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Here is my code,but i'lld like to optimize it.I don't like the idea of it testing all the numbers before the square root of n,considering the fact that one could be faced with finding the factors of a large number. Your answers would be of great help. Thanks in advance.

unsigned int* factor(unsigned int n)
{    
    unsigned int tab[40];
    int dim=0;
    for(int i=2;i<=(int)sqrt(n);++i)
    {
        while(n%i==0)
        {
            tab[dim++]=i;
            n/=i;
        }
    }
    if(n>1)
        tab[dim++]=n;
    return tab;
}
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6  
you have an error, you are returning an array that is on the stack. Any other calls after factor() returns could likely overwrite your array. furthermore, the dimension of the array used (dim) is not returned. –  Les Oct 5 '12 at 18:40
2  
For reference, integer factorization is one of the hard problems. (It's proven to be hard enough that public key encryption (read: SSL, RSA, etc) relies on it.) The best you're really going to get is testing all the prime numbers between 2 and the square root, but then you have to worry about finding primes too. –  cHao Oct 5 '12 at 19:13

7 Answers 7

Here's a suggestion on how to do this in 'proper' c++ (since you tagged as ).

PS. Almost forgot to mention: I optimized the call to sqrt away :)

See it live on http://liveworkspace.org/code/6e2fcc2f7956fafbf637b54be2db014a

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

typedef unsigned int uint;

std::vector<uint> factor(uint n)
{    
    std::vector<uint> tab;

    int dim=0;
    for(unsigned long i=2;i*i <= n; ++i)
    {
        while(n%i==0)
        {
            tab.push_back(i);
            n/=i;
        }
    }
    if(n>1)
        tab.push_back(n);
    return tab;
}

void test(uint x)
{
    auto v = factor(x);
    std::cout << x << ":\t";
    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<uint>(std::cout, ";"));
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    test(1);
    test(2);
    test(4);
    test(43);
    test(47);
    test(9997);
}

Output

1:  
2:  2;
4:  2;2;
43: 43;
47: 47;
9997:   13;769;
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There's a simple change that will cut the run time somewhat: factor out all the 2's, then only check odd numbers.

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If you use

... i*i <= n; ...

It may run much faster than i <= sqrt(n)

By the way, you should try to handle factors of negative n or at least be sure you never pass a neg number

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Thanks...It's faster now –  Victor Chima Oct 5 '12 at 18:48
    
Thats nice , on SO if an answer helps you , you should accept the answer so that everyone else looking at the question in future knows what helped you. –  Rndm Oct 6 '12 at 3:05

I'm afraid you cannot. There is no known method in the planet can factorize large integers in polynomial time. However, there are some methods can help you slightly (not significantly) speed up your program. Search Wikipedia for more references. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integer_factorization

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As seen from your solution , you find basically all prime numbers ( the condition while (n%i == 0)) works like that , especially for the case of large numbers , you could compute prime numbers beforehand, and keep checking only those. The prime number calculation could be done using Sieve of Eratosthenes method or some other efficient method.

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n can change within the loop –  Les Oct 5 '12 at 18:43
    
The value of n changes each time a factor is found, so the old value of sqrt is no longer the square root of the current n. I haven't taken the time to figure out what the loop limit ought to be, though. It may well be correct to hang on to the old sqrt value. –  Pete Becker Oct 5 '12 at 18:43
    
Yes , you are right , I am sorry I looked over this point , edited the answer and removed that point. –  Rndm Oct 5 '12 at 18:45
unsigned int* factor(unsigned int n)

If unsigned int is the typical 32-bit type, the numbers are too small for any of the more advanced algorithms to pay off. The usual enhancements for the trial division are of course worthwhile.

If you're moving the division by 2 out of the loop, and divide only by odd numbers in the loop, as mentioned by Pete Becker, you're essentially halving the number of divisions needed to factor the input number, and thus speed up the function by a factor of very nearly 2.

If you carry that one step further and also eliminate the multiples of 3 from the divisors in the loop, you reduce the number of divisions and hence increase the speed by a factor close to 3 (on average; most numbers don't have any large prime factors, but are divisible by 2 or by 3, and for those the speedup is much smaller; but those numbers are quick to factor anyway. If you factor a longer range of numbers, the bulk of the time is spent factoring the few numbers with large prime divisors).

// if your compiler doesn't transform that to bit-operations, do it yourself
while(n % 2 == 0) {
    tab[dim++] = 2;
    n /= 2;
}
while(n % 3 == 0) {
    tab[dim++] = 3;
    n /= 3;
}
for(int d = 5, s = 2; d*d <= n; d += s, s = 6-s) {
    while(n % d == 0) {
        tab[dim++] = d;
        n /= d;
    }
}

If you're calling that function really often, it would be worthwhile to precompute the 6542 primes not exceeding 65535, store them in a static array, and divide only by the primes to eliminate all divisions that are a priori guaranteed to not find a divisor.

If unsigned int happens to be larger than 32 bits, then using one of the more advanced algorithms would be profitable. You should still begin with trial divisions to find the small prime factors (whether small should mean <= 1000, <= 10000, <= 100000 or perhaps <= 1000000 would need to be tested, my gut feeling says one of the smaller values would be better on average). If after the trial division phase the factorisation is not yet complete, check whether the remaining factor is prime using e.g. a deterministic (for the range in question) variant of the Miller-Rabin test. If it's not, search a factor using your favourite advanced algorithm. For 64 bit numbers, I'd recommend Pollard's rho algorithm or an elliptic curve factorisation. Pollard's rho algorithm is easier to implement and for numbers of that magnitude finds factors in comparable time, so that's my first recommendation.

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I applied this and it got even faster..Thanks –  Victor Chima Oct 7 '12 at 11:55

Int is way to small to encounter any performance problems. I just tried to measure the time of your algorithm with boost but couldn't get any useful output (too fast). So you shouldn't worry about integers at all.

If you use i*i I was able to calculate 1.000.000 9-digit integers in 15.097 seconds. It's good to optimize an algorithm but instead of "wasting" time (depends on your situation) it's important to consider if a small improvement really is worth the effort. Sometimes you have to ask yourself if you rally need to be able to calculate 1.000.000 ints in 10 seconds or if 15 is fine as well.

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1mio is not a lot. Also 'calculating integers' is never the goal. The OP specificly said he needs to get this faster. Your 'answer' basically claims he is wrong. (oh, 15/s is prehistoric performance for any computing task, realistically) –  sehe Oct 13 '12 at 9:29
    
@sehe It is prehistoric for ANY computing task? Overstatement. The op also stated that he wants to do this with integers how is it not his goal? I never said that he is wrong. If he would have said this is too slow (he just said he needs it faster "if possible") and I would have said no you're wrong than your statement would be correct but I just said that this algorithm is already considerable fast. Did you do a performance test on his code (i*i) and the 5 upvote answer? I doubt it because then you would see what I mean and this performance test was on a pretty old pc (should have said that) –  user238801 Oct 13 '12 at 9:52

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