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I have several independent if conditions and in each condition i will evaluate a boolean variable value either true or false.

if the boolean variable value gets false in the first if condition then how can i skip the rest of all conditions.

private static boolean isRecommended(Fruit fruit) {
    boolean isRecommended = true;

    if(fruit.weight > 2){
        isRecommended = false;
    }
    if(!"red".equals(fruit.color)){
        isRecommended = false;
    }
    if(!"sweet".equals(fruit.taste)){
        isRecommended = false;
    }
    if(!fruit.isPerishable){
        isRecommended = false;
    }

    return isRecommended;
}

if the first if() condition is executed then is it possible to return the value. I know in the loops we can use continue keyword to skip the remainder of the loop execution. How can we achieve something similar here.

Update:

i do not mean exactly on the first if() condition, if any of the if() condition is executed then what is best way of skipping the rest of the conditions like continue does in loop

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2  
Why not use if-else if - else construct? –  Rohit Jain Oct 5 '12 at 19:09
    
extends your bracket from that and incase of false use break statement. –  greatmajestics Oct 5 '12 at 19:10
3  
Get rid of your isRecommended and return false from your ifs. –  NullUserException Oct 5 '12 at 19:11
    
Why do you need to skip the rest of the conditions? Is it because you have a performance bottleneck that you need to eliminate, or do you sometimes get the wrong result? –  Mark Byers Oct 5 '12 at 19:15
    
sorry, i dont mean exactly on the first if() condition, if any of the if() condition is executed then what is best way of skipping the rest of the conditions like continue does in loop –  Kaipa M Sarma Oct 5 '12 at 19:21

10 Answers 10

up vote 24 down vote accepted
return fruit.weight <= 2 
    && "red".equals(fruit.color) 
    && "sweet".equals(fruit.taste)
    && fruit.isPerishable;
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1  
+1 Liked the oneliner.. Good thinking.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 5 '12 at 19:18
    
This is the best answer - ANDing all requirements together, it's more clear and less code. The other answers are awkward in that they check for the negative. –  Steve Kuo Oct 5 '12 at 20:04
    
Lets say we make it THE NICE ANSWER !! :-) –  nIcE cOw Oct 7 '12 at 2:56

For a general solution you could use else if:

if(fruit.weight > 2){
    isRecommended = false;
}
else if(!"red".equals(fruit.color)){
   //etc...
}

But in your specific example you can just use boolean logic:

return !(
   fruit.weight > 2 ||
   !"red".equals(fruit.color) ||
   !"sweet".equals(fruit.taste) ||
   !fruit.isPerishable
);

You could use your IDE to refactor the logic of this expression by applying De Morgan's laws. Most decent IDEs can do this for you with a few keystrokes.

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1  
You could De Morgan that boolean logic; IMO it looks confusing this way. –  NullUserException Oct 5 '12 at 19:18
    
You could do, but then you would probably get it wrong like this guy did. Humans are not designed for doing De Morgan logic in their head. Write it in the way (in the OP's opinion) is most logical then get your IDE to do the De Morgan inversion for you. –  Mark Byers Oct 5 '12 at 19:21
1  
@dystroy: I'm not saying your version is less readable. I'm saying that humans shouldn't do the De Morgan conversion when the IDE has a feature that does exactly this for you automatically and never gets its wrong. –  Mark Byers Oct 5 '12 at 19:29
1  
@dystroy FWIW AmitD got it wrong too, but fixed it after/as I posted a comment on it. So Mark might have a point. –  NullUserException Oct 5 '12 at 19:29
1  
@MarkByers You're right in that we shouldn't do this conversion. But my solution isn't to let an IDE do it but to get back to the intent. For me speed of coding is much less relevant than speed of reading/fixing/maintaining (personal opinion). –  dystroy Oct 5 '12 at 19:30

You can condense it like this, by using multiple return statements that will return early and skip the rest. For added brevity I also removed the unneeded curly braces.

private static boolean isRecommended(Fruit fruit) {
    if(fruit.weight > 2)
        return false;
    if(!"red".equals(fruit.color))
        return false;
    if(!"sweet".equals(fruit.taste))
        return false;
    if(!fruit.isPerishable)
        return false;
    return true;
}
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8  
I'm not a huge fan of removing "unneeded" curly braces. What if in the future someone decides to add a statement before one of these returns (eg: a log)? No syntax error will be produced (although it might complain about dead code) and now you have a mess in your hands. –  NullUserException Oct 5 '12 at 19:14
1  
@NullUserException: I agree, not everyone is. I used to be against it, but I have found that it makes it more readable because it is smaller and doesn't make it more prone to introducing errors. In addition Robert Martin argues for the elimination of unneeded curlies in his book Clean Code as well. Not that I agree with him on everything, but I do on this. –  Robert Hanson Oct 5 '12 at 19:21
    
To me, it's not whether it's more errorprone or not, but that the IDE's autoformatting ruins brace formatting anyway; and consistent autoformatting is good for version control. –  Johan Sjöberg Oct 5 '12 at 19:28
    
@JohanSjöberg I use NetBeans and have yet to see its autoformatting ruin my braces. But then I've adapted my style to that suggested by Sun/Oracle, which I assume is what NetBeans uses in its autoformatting. –  Code-Apprentice Oct 5 '12 at 19:37

if the first if() condition is executed then is it possible to return the value.

Isn't that just it?

if(fruit.weight > 2){
    return false; // etc.
}

Or am I misunderstanding your question?

share|improve this answer
    
sorry, i dont mean exactly on the first if() condition, if any of the if() condition is executed then what is best way of skipping the rest of the conditions like continue does in loop –  Kaipa M Sarma Oct 5 '12 at 19:21
    
Ah, I figured you would extrapolate from my suggestion to Robert Hanson's answer (stackoverflow.com/a/12752626/58668). The general answer: use any control flow operator which is suitable for the task. Another solution is do { ... } while (0), and then break when you have the answer; a third solution is to use exceptions. Both are overkill for the problem at hand, though, so I'd go with the return-based one. –  Jonas Kölker Oct 12 '12 at 10:13

The tests will stop at the first not verified.

private static boolean isRecommended(Fruit fruit) {
    return 
            fruit.weight <= 2
            && "red".equals(fruit.color)
            && "sweet".equals(fruit.taste)
            && fruit.isPerishable
    ;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Arg... too many negations in OP's code... my head, it hurts... –  dystroy Oct 5 '12 at 19:17

You can just write

return isRecommended;

inside your ifs. return can be used multiple times.

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it thows the compile time error "This method must return a result of type boolean" –  Kaipa M Sarma Oct 5 '12 at 19:13
    
@KaipaMSarma.. At the end of all the if- blocks, you need to return a value .. return true.. i.e replace your return isRecommended currently with return true. –  Rohit Jain Oct 5 '12 at 19:20

The simple answer is to return within the if blocks, rather than setting a value. However, that's not exactly scalable, and returning within the blocks increases code complexity.

The complicated, but more flexible answer, is to create an interface that allows you to implement custom logic.

interface RecommendationFilter<T>
{
    boolean recommend(T item);
}

And then, in some implementation, one can use a bunch of generically loaded RecommendationFilters to loop through.

class FruitChecker
{
    private final Set<RecommendationFilter<Fruit>> filters = ...;

    public boolean isRecommended(Fruit fruit)
    {
        boolean recommended = true;

        for (RecommendationFilter<Fruit> filter : filters)
        {
            if ( ! filter.recommend(fruit))
            {
                recommended = false;
                break;
            }
        }

        return recommended;
    }
}

This idea scales up pretty well, and it enables some pretty interesting implementations.

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Just put a return false in your first conditional.

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Wrap the rest of the if statements in an else statement:

private static boolean isRecommended(Fruit fruit) {
    boolean isRecommended = true;

    if(fruit.weight > 2){
        isRecommended = false;
    } else {
        if(!"red".equals(fruit.color)){
            isRecommended = false;
        }
        if(!"sweet".equals(fruit.taste)){
            isRecommended = false;
        }
        if(!fruit.isPerishable){
            isRecommended = false;
        }
    }

    return isRecommended;
}

p.s. I highly recommend using spaces rather than tabs for indenting. Tabs often do not port to other editors or environments they way you want.

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I have found another solution, that is the usage of label blocks with break statement. Below is the code

private static boolean isRecommended(Fruit fruit) {
    boolean isRecommended = true;

    labelA:
    {
        if(fruit.weight > 2){
            isRecommended = false;
            break labelA;
        }
        if(!"red".equals(fruit.color)){
            isRecommended = false;
            break labelA;
        }
        if(!"sweet".equals(fruit.taste)){
            isRecommended = false;
            break labelA;
        }
        if(!fruit.isPerishable){
            isRecommended = false;
        }
    }
    return isRecommended;


}
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