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I'm running through some programming exercises and one involves implementing a date class object from scratch.

Overall the class design and implementation part of it was a piece of cake but the trouble came along during date input and copying to private data members.

The date input method must be in the format MM/DD/YY and class data members must be three int types (month, day, year) for the exercise.

So my implementation consists of taking input using cin to a character array and then converting those array elements to int data types for the class data members.

Initially I thought to take each number column separately, multiply the tens column by ten and add the ones column in to get the int but that didn't pan out since your still doing mathematical operands on a character data type.

I did find a solution, but its a kludge and I feel there's gotta be a better, more eloquent way of doing this.

Also as a side note, I was wondering if someone could tell me why I get a stack overflow error during runtime when I reduce my char array size to 8 from 9. I thought char arrays only needed the size + 1 for the \0 character. By my count I should be good with temp[8] for a total of 9 spots (2 day 2 month 2 year and 2 / and 1 \0 =9) I'm sure I'm missing something here. Anyways i'm using VC++ 2008 for my compiler if that matters.

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::cin;

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
class date {
private:
    int day, month, year;
public:
    date() : day(0), month(0), year(0) {};
    void getDate(char*);
    void showDate();
    int chartoint(char);
};

int date::chartoint(char a) {
    switch(a) {
        case '0': return 0;
        case '1': return 1;
        case '2': return 2;
        case '3': return 3;
        case '4': return 4;
        case '5': return 5;
        case '6': return 6;
        case '7': return 7;
        case '8': return 8;
        case '9': return 9;
    };
};

void date::getDate(char dArray[]) {

    day=(chartoint(dArray[3])*10+chartoint(dArray[4])); 
    month=(chartoint(dArray[0])*10+chartoint(dArray[1])); 
    year=(chartoint(dArray[6])*10+chartoint(dArray[7])); 


};

void date::showDate()
{
    cout << std::setiosflags(std::ios::fixed | std::ios::showpoint);
    (month<10) ? cout << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << month : cout << month;
    cout << "/";
    (day<10) ? cout << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << day : cout << day;
    cout << "/";
    (year<10) ? cout << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << year : cout << year;
    cout << endl;


};
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
int main()
{
    date a;
    char temp[9];

    cout << "Enter Date (mm/dd/yy): ";
    cin >> temp;

    a.getDate(temp);

    a.showDate();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
4  
Note that you can safely subtract '0' from '0' to '9' to get the digit (also note that it's not safe for letters). Also consider using std::string instead of char arrays. –  chris Oct 5 '12 at 19:25
1  
@chris To back you up: "In both the source and execution basic character sets, the value of each character after 0 in the above list of decimal digits shall be one greater than the value of the previous." –  Joseph Mansfield Oct 5 '12 at 19:26
    
Thanks, I'd fixed it in my IDE when I was editing the extraneous debugging portions out for better readability. –  Lorek Oct 5 '12 at 19:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Extremely simple solution (although C-style) would be to read int directly from char* by using function sscanf():

void date::getDate(const char *sDate) // const = "getDate will not change sDate"
{
    sscanf(sDate, "%d/%d/%d", &month, &day, &year);
};

C++ solution would use std::string instead of char*, thus body of main should look like this:

date a;
std::string temp;

cout << "Enter Date (mm/dd/yy): ";
cin >> temp;

a.getDate(temp);
a.showDate();

then your getDate method could take reference to std::string object, that is not going to change, in other words const std::string&. For reading values from std::string you could construct std::istringstream object then:

#include <sstream>
...
void date::getDate(const std::string& sDate)
{
    std::istringstream ssDate(sDate);
    ssDate >> month;
    ssDate.ignore();
    ssDate >> day;
    ssDate.ignore();
    ssDate >> year;
};

Also note that method chartoint is redundant and showDate() could be simple like this:

void date::showDate()
{
    cout << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << month << '/';
    cout << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << day << '/';
    cout << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << year << endl;
};
share|improve this answer

It seems, the easiest way would be to read into int variables and skipping the separating / characters. That is, you would define an input operator:

std::istream& operator>> (std::istream& in, date& value) {
    // read the value for a date
    return in;
}

Iy you read a string into a char array you need to make sure you don't attempt to store more characters than there is space in the char array. Also, you should always verify that reading was successful:

if (std::cin >> std::setw(sizeof(temp) >> temp) {
    // process the read characters
}

Just a note of caution: don't try to use sizeof() as above with pointers to a char array: it would determine the size of the pointer, not the size of the pointed to array.

BTW, you correctly computed that storing a date and its terminating null character take 9 chars. Why do you think they would fit into an array of 8 chars?

share|improve this answer
    
"Why do you think they would fit into an array of 8 chars?" - OP wrote: "I should be good with temp for a total of 9 spots (2 day 2 month 2 year and 2 '/' and 1 '\0' = 9)" –  LihO Oct 5 '12 at 19:51
    
Thanks, I haven't quite gotten to operator overloading yet so its a little above me but that's good I can look back on it after I'm through that section. –  Lorek Oct 5 '12 at 19:52
    
An array declaration for temp[8] holds 9 values Index[0-8], but pops a stack overflow error in this case, I was wondering what I was missing since that number is all that I figured I'd need. –  Lorek Oct 5 '12 at 19:57
    
An array declaration for temp[8] holds only 8 values in indices 0-7. A little confusing that after the declaration where you say temp[8] then using temp[8] is actually accessing out of bounds of your array. –  Soverman Oct 5 '12 at 19:58
    
@LihO: He clearly stated that he attempted to reduce his array size "... to 8 from 9 ..." and even the section you quoted mentioned "temp[8]" - just to go on to explain that 9 characters are actually needed! That's all I commented on. –  Dietmar Kühl Oct 5 '12 at 20:00

Here's a solution using std::stringstream:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <sstream>

using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::cin;
using std::stringstream;

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
class date {
private:
  int day, month, year;
public:
  date() : day(0), month(0), year(0) {};
  void getDate(char*);
  void showDate();
};

void date::getDate(char dArray[]) {
  std::stringstream ss(dArray);
  ss>>month;
  ss.ignore();
  ss>>day;
  ss.ignore();
  ss>>year;
};

void date::showDate()
{
  cout << std::setiosflags(std::ios::fixed | std::ios::showpoint);
  (month<10) ? cout << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << month : cout << month;
  cout << "/";
  (day<10) ? cout << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << day : cout << day;
  cout << "/";
  (year<10) ? cout << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << year : cout << year;
  cout << endl;


};
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
int main()
{
  date a;
  char temp[9];

  cout << "Enter Date (mm/dd/yy): ";
  cin >> temp;

  a.getDate(temp);

  a.showDate();
  return 0;
}

And a shorter way to write your chartoint function that exploits the fact that 0-9 in ASCII are all consecutively laid out:

int date::chartoint(char a) {
  return a-'0';
};

Also note that when you declare an array, the value inside the [] is actually the SIZE, not the last legal index. So an array declaration for temp[8] holds only 8 values in indices 0-7.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for clearing that up with the array size, its been awhile since I've done any programming. –  Lorek Oct 5 '12 at 20:06
    
Note that chartoint is never used and showDate can be much simpler. –  LihO Oct 5 '12 at 20:29

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