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I'm trying to learn TDD and Unit Testing and I'm building a small application for the purpose.

I'm building a timer class but I can't make a test pass. I want to test that a method is called when the time on the timer is elapsed.

I have the following class:

public class TimeOutTimer
{
    private readonly ISubscriber _subscriber;
    private Timer _timer;

    public TimeOutTimer(ISubscriber subscriber)
    {
        _subscriber = subscriber;
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        _timer = new Timer(1000);
        _timer.Start();
        _timer.Elapsed += TimerOnElapsed;
    }

    private void TimerOnElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs elapsedEventArgs)
    {
        _subscriber.TimeReached();   
    }
}

And the test, using Moq:

[Test]
public void Start_WithValidParameters_TriggersTimeReached()
{
    var subscriberMock = new Mock<ISubscriber>();
    var timer = new TimeOutTimer(subscriberMock.Object);

    timer.Start();

    subscriberMock.Verify(subscriber => subscriber.TimeReached());
}

If I take the Timer out and make a direct call to _subscriber.TimeReached(), it works.

Am I doing something wrong?

Thank you in advance!

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The _subscriber.TimeReached() is it ever going into that if you debug through the test? Im guessing not since subscriber is mocked. –  Adam Oct 5 '12 at 20:15
    
The TimerOnElapsed is not even being called. Do I need to somehow "wait" on the test, for the timer to get activated? Hmmmm..... –  Dante Oct 5 '12 at 20:17
    
But answering on your question, when I call _subscriber.TimeReached() directly without the Elapsed event, it works as expected and the Verify confirms that a call was made to the mocked interface method. –  Dante Oct 5 '12 at 20:23
    
If you have posted a complete implementation of TimeOutTimer then you should also implement IDisposable. And you could in fact replace you call of new TimeOutTimer(subscriber) with new System.Threading.Timer(state => subscriber.TimeReached(), null, 1000, 0) and eliminate the TimeOutTimer entirely. –  Patko Oct 5 '12 at 20:52
1  
I realize you are doing this as a learning exercise - but in reality there's not much benefit in 'testing the framework'. Your test essentially verifies that a timer raises its Elapsed event. Personally, I would take that as read and not test for it. What is worth testing is whether your event handler does what it is supposed to do. –  Tim Long Oct 6 '12 at 3:46
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In your example the event should be invoked after 1000ms, whereas you verify straight away. Clearly the event cannot be invoked at that point.

The easy way out is to put a thread sleep in your test.

[Test]
public void Start_WithValidParameters_TriggersTimeReached()
{
    var subscriberMock = new Mock<ISubscriber>();
    var timer = new TimeOutTimer(subscriberMock.Object);        

    timer.Start();
    Thread.Sleep(1000);

    subscriberMock.Verify(subscriber => subscriber.TimeReached());
}

However this is not really the correct way to generate a unit test for a time based class.

The correct way would be to create an ITimer interface which is then implemented by an adapter based on Timer.

The the ITimer then becomes a dependency of TimeoutTimer, and is passed to it in the constructor or as a property.

In your test you can then Mock the timer so it synchronises with your test without waiting (e.g. by being able to manually trigger the event by controlling the class).

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You know that might cause more trouble. Imagine if the wait is for 10 minutes, you can not run the unit test waiting for 10 minutes. Better approach would be to inject the timer. –  AD.Net Oct 5 '12 at 20:38
    
@AD.Net which is what I suggest in the second paragraph. I completely agree with you. –  Sklivvz Oct 5 '12 at 20:41
    
I was on the right track then. I added the Sleep and it did pass the test. The "implemented by an adapter based on Timer" is a bit confusing, I think you're referring to an Adapter pattern here. I'm going to try your suggestion to solve the problem in a more elegant way.Thank you for the help! –  Dante Oct 5 '12 at 20:45
    
@Dante what I mean is that you need an interface for the mocking, but Timer doesn't implement it, so you need to use the Adapter pattern to create a class which implements a timer that has the interface you need. You are clearly on the right track. –  Sklivvz Oct 5 '12 at 20:53
1  
@Sklivvz Yeah, I just read through the Adapter pattern and it makes perfect sense to use in this scenario. Many thanks ;) –  Dante Oct 5 '12 at 21:10
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Well, you are dealing with an asynchronous operation here. If you put a breakpoint in the handler and you debug through the code, and if you wait on the verify line for a spell, then when you step over the verify line you will see that the handler does execute. Your problem is that your test finishes before the handler has a chance to fire.

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You have to raise the Elapsed event in the test.

I am suspecting it's the new timer that's causing trouble. You can try making it injectable, then inject it in test and raise the event.

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