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I want to understand how a transpiler works. The best to do this is to write one ofcourse.

I've been looking into a few resources to understand how this works, theoretically. And i understand the following:

From what i understand i basically need to write two classes:

  1. A Lexical Analyzer
  2. A Parser

Lexical Analyzer

The Lexical Analyzer takes the source code of a file as input (the input stream). For example the following code:

if (someVar == 20) {
    MessageBox("Hello World!");
}

Then the Lexical Analyzer creates chunks of data out of this:

[if]
[ ]
[(]
[someVar]
[ ]
[==]
[ ]
[20]
[)]
[ ]
[{]
[\n]
[\t]
[MessageBox]
[(]
["]
[Hello World!]
["]
[)]
[;]
[\n]
[\t]
[}]

This will then be sent to the Parser class.

The Parser

The Parser class will then read all the chunks of tokens(?) and specify what each token(?) means. It will assign a certain type to it. So the result of the above string will be identified as something like:

[if]      // Keyword
[ ]       // Whitespace
[(]       // L_Parenthesis
[someVar] // Identifier
[ ]       // Whitespace
[==]      // Operator
[ ]       // Whitespace
[20]      // Number (or Integer)
[)]       // R_Parenthesis
[ ]       // Whitespace
[{]       // L_Bracket
[\n]      // Whitespace
[\t]      // Whitespace
[MessageBox] // Keyword
[(]       // L_Parenthesis
["]       // Not yet sure where this would go
[Hello World!] // Same..
["]       // Same...
[)]       // R_Parenthesis
[;]       // Semicolon
[\n]      // Whitespace
[\t]      // Whitespace
[}]       // R_Bracket

As you can see, i haven't fully sorted out what types exactly goes where. But this should be the basic idea.

Now the next thing i'd like to do, is convert that source code to another source code, thus transpiling it. But how does that work? I can't find any direct tutorials, explanations about that.

Suppose i have the following custom code:

def myVar = true;

public function myFunc ( def arg1 )
{
    if ( arg1 == true ) {
        MessageBox("My Message");
    }
}

Then the Lexical process will parse this code. Then how do i convert that to something like Javascript?

var myVar = true;

myFunc = function ( arg1 )
{
    if ( arg1 == true ) {
        alert("My Message");
    }
}

How does the mapping work, going from my custom cdoe, to a code like Javascript? Like, the function declaration. My Lexical parser has the following: public, function, myFunc. How can it know that it should map that to: myFunc = function ...?

Anyone any good and practical information on how this should be done in an transpiler? Or am i going the wrong to by writing a lexical analyzer for this job?

Edit

So obviously my idea how the lexer / parser works isn't exactly right. Any "pseudo" information on how this process works (with pseudo examples) is more than welcome.

share|improve this question
    
What you call a lexer does not strip enough superfluous information (e.g. the whitespace) , and classification of each token (which you describe as job of the parser) is part of the lexer's output. A pass which just breaks the input into pieces without classifying them is not useful. –  delnan Oct 5 '12 at 20:14
    
@delnan The classification is done by the parser, which in return, returns it back to the lexical parser. In anyway, everything will be classified. And what do you mean by "not stripping enough superfluous information, like whitespaces"? This is just a basic example/idea. And besides that, I need to preserve the whitespaces when i need to do a look-behind or look-ahead. That's how the old Fortran Lexical Analyzer got into trouble, by ignorig white spaces... –  w00 Oct 5 '12 at 20:20
    
The parser does higher level work (grouping tokens into expressions/statements/declarations etc., figuring out precedence, and so on). The tokens coming out of the lexer are already classified. I'd like to see a source for your definition, as I have more sources than I can recall for mine, and I have already written lexers and parsers. As for ignoring whitespace specifically: While some languages require information about whitespace, there are generally some bits of input which can and should be ignored completely. Also note that parsing is just the very first step towards generating code. –  delnan Oct 5 '12 at 20:24
1  
See my SO answer "how to translate between programming languages" stackoverflow.com/a/3460977/120163 I think you'll find that learning how to do this is better started by doing some serious reading on compiler technology, than by attempting to build with little or no background. –  Ira Baxter Oct 5 '12 at 20:30
    
@delnan I don't have any source, still trying to think this entire process through. And i'm sure you know what you're talking about. I'm not doubting that in anyway. –  w00 Oct 5 '12 at 20:33

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