Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Silverlight client using MEF/Prism that connects to a WCF service. I am writing a "service agent" to use as a shared service throughout the application. This "service agent" is a singleton that provides the only way for the client to call the WCF service. I've implemented my service contract and all of the methods look very similar, except for the specific Begin/End operations they call and the arguments they accept.

For example:

public void WakeUpInstanceAsync(Foo opportunity, bool isHistorical, Action<WakeupObj> callback)
{
    if (IsOpen())
    {
        AsyncCallback asyncCallback = (e) =>
        {
            _currentDispatcher.BeginInvoke(() =>
            {
                try
                {
                    callback(_funnelClient.EndWakeUpInstance(e));
                }
                catch (CommunicationException ex1)
                {
                    // Notify someone via eventaggregator?
                    callback(null);
                }
            });
        };

        _funnelClient.BeginWakeUpInstance(opportunity, isHistorical, asyncCallback, null);
    }
}

Is there any way I could create a generic method that takes a 2 parameters (the "begin" method and the "end" method)?

share|improve this question
1  
Off topic, but based on your comment in your catch this might help. You can change your callback parameter to Action<Func<WakeupObj>>. Then callback(() => _funnelClient.EndWakeupInstance(e)) to force the exception into whatever is calling WakeupInstanceAsync. Whatever is calling this method is most likely better suited at exception handling. –  cadrell0 Oct 5 '12 at 20:48
    
@cadrell0 wow, thanks for the advice. I like that idea much better! How exactly would I call that new method? Currently, I'm calling it like myClient.WakeUpInstanceAsync(opportunity, true, (wuObj) => _wakeUpObject = wuObj); –  Ryan Oct 5 '12 at 20:58
    
@cadrell0 nevermind, I figured out all I had to treat wuObj as a Func rather than an object and invoked it like wuObj() –  Ryan Oct 5 '12 at 21:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Would something like this be what you are looking for?

    public void WakeUpInstanceAsync(Foo opportunity, bool isHistorical, Action<WakeupObj> callback)
    {
        this.ImplementAsyncMethod(
            asyncCallback => _funnelClient.BeginWakeUpInstance(opportunity, isHistorical, asyncCallback, null),
            asyncResult => _funnelClient.EndWakeUpInstance(asyncResult),
            callback);
    }

    public void ImplementAsyncMethod<T>(Action<AsyncCallback> begin, Func<IAsyncResult, T> end, Action<T> callback)
    {
        if (IsOpen())
        {
            AsyncCallback asyncCallback = (e) =>
            {
                _currentDispatcher.BeginInvoke(() =>
                {
                    try
                    {
                        callback(end(e));
                    }
                    catch (CommunicationException ex1)
                    {
                        // Notify someone via eventaggregator?
                        callback(default(T));
                    }
                });
            };

            begin(asyncCallback);
        }
    }

(disclaimer - I have not compiled it)

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this is along the lines of what I was thinking of. I would love to use TPL, but I am not in a position to use a ported version for Silverlight, so I think this at least gets me started. –  Ryan Oct 5 '12 at 20:45

You can use TaskFactory.FromAsync to wrap nearly any Begin/End asynchronous method pair into a Task<T>. This provides a much cleaner model for working with asynchronous programming, as you can then just use a continuation on the UI thread for your "callback".

share|improve this answer
    
I just re-tagged, to clarify that I'm using SL4...Tasks don't exist in SL4, do they? –  Ryan Oct 5 '12 at 20:26
2  
@Ryan You could always use: perreira.net/matthieu/?page_id=172 or damonpayne.com/post/2011/02/07/… –  Reed Copsey Oct 5 '12 at 20:35

Seems like you would need an WakeUpInstanceResult class to hold the multiple parameters.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.