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I'm unit testing a URL fetcher, and I need a test url which always causes urllib2.urlopen() (Python) to time out. I've tried making a php page with just sleep(10000) in it, but that causes 500 internal server error.

How would I make a resource that causes a connection timeout in the client whenever it is requested?

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5 Answers 5

Edit: I saw the [php] tag and just assumed this was PHP code -- however, the same principles can apply in Python if that's the language you're working with.

Successful unit testing requires that you test units of code in complete isolation from all outside influences. This means that if your test depends on things like the file system (or in this case some external web server) to function correctly, you're doing it wrong. When your tests depend on an external web server you're adding significant complexity to the test code as well as introducing the possibility of false positives and other erroneous test results.

It sounds like the current testing implementation necessitates a full-blown mock web server to deliver specific, testable responses. This should not be the case. Such far-reaching test dependencies only lead to the problems outlined above.

A Better Way

But how do you test native PHP functionality and its interactions with remote data (like HTTP or FTP)? The answer is to add test "seams" to your code. Consider the following simple example:

<?php

class UrlRetriever {

    public function retrieve($uri) {
        $response = $this->doRetrieve($uri);
        if (false !== $response) {
            return $response;
        } else {
            throw new RuntimeException(
                'Retrieval failed for ' . $uri
            );
        }
    }

    /**
     * A test seam to allow mocking of `file_get_contents` results
     */
    protected function doRetrieve($uri) {
        // suppress the warning from a failure since we're testing against the
        // return value (FALSE on failure)
        return @file_get_contents($uri); 
    }
}

And your relevant PHPUnit test would look something like this:

<?php

class UrlRetrieverTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase {

    /**
     * @covers UrlRetriever::retrieve
     * @expectedException RuntimeException
     */
    public function testRetrieveThrowsExceptionOnFailure() {
        $retriever = $this->getMock('UrlRetriever', array('doRetrieve'));
        $retriever->expects($this->once())
                  ->method('doRetrieve')
                  ->will($this->returnValue(false));

        $retriever->retrieve('http://someurl');
    }

    /**
     * @covers UrlRetriever::retrieve
     */
    public function testSomeSpecificOutputIsHandledCorrectly() {
        $expectedValue = 'Some value I want to manipulate';

        $retriever = $this->getMock('UrlRetriever', array('doRetrieve'));
        $retriever->expects($this->once())
                  ->method('doRetrieve')
                  ->will($this->returnValue($expectedValue));

        $response = $retriever->retrieve('http://someurl');
        $this->assertEquals($response, $expectedValue);
    }
}

Obviously, this example is contrived and extremely simple, but the concept scales out as far as you need it to. By creating test seams like the above UrlRetriever::doRetrieve method we're able to easily mock the results using standard test frameworks.

This method allows us to test the otherwise complicated result of native PHP functions that manipulate remote resources without ever having to touch an external web server or introducing the possibility of errors outside of the system under test.

In the OP's specific case, if a timeout result is desired, simply mock the relevant test seam method to do whatever the native PHP function would do in the event of a timeout.

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Have you tried httpbin's /delay?

httpbin is a HTTP Request & Response Service written in Python (I think Kenneth Reitz developed it to test the requests module while writing it), source is on GitHub. I'm not actually sure if /delay will delay accepting the request connection, or sending the response. But if it doesn't exactly fit your needs, it should be very easy to modify or extend it.

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Connection timeout? Use, for example, netcat. Listen on some port (nc -l), and then try to download data from that port.. http://localhost:port/. It will open connection, which will never reply.

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Oh, you should totally test for timeouts. You just shouldn't open an actual URL and wait for a timeout, just like you shouldn't hit the network when testing anything else. All this assuming we're talking about unit tests, there is also some value in integration tests which do the real thing. –  delnan Oct 5 '12 at 20:28
    
@delnan, you're totally right. I'm probably overworked, I deleted the 'unit test' part. –  Yossarian Oct 5 '12 at 20:31
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In PHP you can send a header with status code 408

header("HTTP/1.0 408 Request Timeout");
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Not sure if this suits OP's need, but very cool idea. –  dimo414 Oct 5 '12 at 20:38
    
@dimo414 thanks =) I don't know anything about python, so that was my best guess. –  Brian Glaz Oct 5 '12 at 20:41
1  
This won't cause a connection timeout. The TCP connection will be established immediately, but the HTTP response will be 408. That status means the server dropped the connection the client opened to transmit the HTTP request because the client stopped sending for too long. That's totally different from a connection timeout, where the client tries to establish a TCP connection to do HTTP over, but gives up because the server doesn't respond. –  Lukas Graf Oct 5 '12 at 20:44
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

While there have been some good answers here, I found that a simple php sleep() call with an override to Apache's timeout was all I needed.

I know that unit tests should be in isolation, but the server this endpoint is hosted on is no going anywhere.

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