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What is the most efficient way to look up the adjacent elements in a STL map using the examples I mention below:

Suppose I have a map of integer - string:

1 -> Test1
5 -> Test2
10 -> Test3
20 -> Test4
50 -> Test5

If I call:

get_adjacent(1) // Returns iterator to 1 and 5
get_adjacent(2) // Returns iterator to 1 and 5
get_adjacent(24) // Returns iterator to  20 and 50
get_adjacent(50) // Returns iterator to 20 and 50
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2  
I don't think std::map is necessarily the right thing to use if you want to do this. Take a look at some std algorithms: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm –  Zyx 2000 Oct 5 '12 at 20:59
3  
Adjacency makes no sense for a map. –  TJD Oct 5 '12 at 21:00
1  
From your examples, it is still unclear what you mean by "adjacent". Can you describe what this means? –  Code-Apprentice Oct 5 '12 at 21:01
    
If you wanted a cooked answer, it would be wise for you to include actual code, so we don't have to make up context. This is why I stop at the detail level I currently provide. /cc @Xeo –  sehe Oct 5 '12 at 21:33

1 Answer 1

Use std::lower_bound and std::upper_bound for exactly this.

Better yet std::map::equal_range combines the power of both:

See it live on http://liveworkspace.org/code/d3a5eb4ec726ae3b5236b497d81dcf27

#include <map>
#include <iostream>

const auto data = std::map<int, std::string> {
    { 1  , "Test1" }, 
        { 5  , "Test2" }, 
        { 10 , "Test3" }, 
        { 20 , "Test4" }, 
        { 50 , "Test5" }, 
};

template <typename Map, typename It>
void debug_print(Map const& map, It it)
{
    if (it != map.end())
        std::cout << it->first;
    else
        std::cout << "[end]";
}

void test(int key)
{
    auto bounds = data.equal_range(key);

    std::cout << key << ": " ; debug_print(data, bounds.first)  ; 
    std::cout << ", "        ; debug_print(data, bounds.second) ; 
    std::cout << '\n'        ; 
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    test(1);
    test(2);
    test(24);
    test(50);
}

Outputs:

1: 1, 5
2: 5, 5
24: 50, 50
50: 50, [end]
share|improve this answer
    
First, use the map members, second use equal_range which is [lower_bound(), upper_bound()]. –  Xeo Oct 5 '12 at 21:04
    
@Xeo that's exactly what I just posted. Took me some time to get useful demo output for the iterators :) –  sehe Oct 5 '12 at 21:18
    
Note that test(2) should be 1, 5 not 5, 5 and test(24) and test(50) should be 20, 50. –  Xeo Oct 5 '12 at 21:24
    
@Xeo I'm just showing the standard facilities here. I figure the OP can extrapolate it from here - the rest is rather pedestrian (a bit of std::prev and boundary checking should do). I choose to stop here, as chances are that this solves the issue already by virtue of the usual XY component –  sehe Oct 5 '12 at 21:32
    
The problem with this solution is that map::lower_bound will return the first element that does not evaluate less than the key (see map::lower_bound description), which implies that if you ask for test(0.5) you will receive the interval from 1 to 5. –  Tryskele Mar 21 '13 at 18:02

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