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Is is possible to have a recursive property in the model? The goal is to dynamically build a string with each action. here's what I'm working with:

public class Action
{
    public int ActionId { get; set; }
    public int? ParentId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string ActionName { 
    {
        get
        {
            // example result: 1Ai or 2Bi
            return ....
        }
    }
}

List<Action> aList = new List<Action>() {
    new Action { ActionId = 1, Name = "Step 1" },
    new Action { ActionId = 2, Name = "Step 2" },
    new Action { ActionId = 3, ParentId = 1, Name = "A" },
    new Action { ActionId = 4, ParentId = 1, Name = "B" },
    new Action { ActionId = 5, ParentId = 2, Name = "A" },
    new Action { ActionId = 6, ParentId = 2, Name = "B" },
    new Action { ActionId = 5, ParentId = 3, Name = "i" },
    new Action { ActionId = 6, ParentId = 6, Name = "i" }
}
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2 Answers 2

It's certainly possible (although I wouldn't call it recursive). You can do it by passing the parent in the constructor.

public class Foo
{
   public Foo(string name)
   {
      Name = name;
   }

   public Foo(Foo parent, string name)
   {
      Name = parent.Name + name;
   }

   public string Name {get; set;}
}

//


var foo = new Foo("Step 1");
var bar = new Foo(foo, "A");

// etc.

Sometimes people like to keep a reference to the whole parent class in the child class, so for example the name property can be generated on the fly with the most recent version.

This would indeed generate a cascade of calls (so be careful!)

public class Foo
{
   string _innerName;

   public Foo(string name)
   {
      _innerName = name;
   }

   public Foo(Foo parent, string name)
   {
      _innerName = name;
      _parent = parent;
   }

   public string Name
   {
      get
      {
         return parent == null? _innerName; parent.Name + _innerName;
      }
   }
}

//


var foo = new Foo("Step 1");
var bar = new Foo(foo, "A");

// etc.
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There's many ways to do so, one of the possible approaches:

    class Program
    {
        static List<Action> aList;

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            aList = new List<Action>() {
    new Action { ActionId = 1, Name = "Step 1" },
    new Action { ActionId = 2, Name = "Step 2" },
    new Action { ActionId = 3, ParentId = 1, Name = "A" },
    new Action { ActionId = 4, ParentId = 1, Name = "B" },
    new Action { ActionId = 5, ParentId = 2, Name = "A" },
    new Action { ActionId = 6, ParentId = 2, Name = "B" },
    new Action { ActionId = 5, ParentId = 3, Name = "i" },
    new Action { ActionId = 6, ParentId = 6, Name = "i" }
};
            Console.WriteLine(aList[2].ActionName);
            Console.ReadKey();

        }

        public class Action
        {
            public int ActionId { get; set; }
            public int? ParentId { get; set; }
            public string Name { get; set; }
            public string ActionName
            {

                get
                {
                    // example result: 1Ai or 2Bi
                    var parent = aList.Find((p) => p.ActionId == ParentId).ActionId;
                    var child = aList.Find((p) => p.ParentId == ActionId).Name;
                    return  String.Format("{0}{1}{2}", parent, Name, child) ;
                }
            }
        }
    }
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