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I have got a toughie for you.

I have a program that fills a 2d array with Tile objects of "w" type. Then the program selects a random point(center) in the array and attempts to turn all of the objects within a radius of 4 from the center. Somehow the program doesn't do it and I think the issue is the math formula, but I cant find the mistake.

class Map
  def initialize(d1,d2)
    @data = Array.new(d1) { Array.new(d2)}
  end

  def [](x, y)
   @data[x][y]
  end

  def x(x)
    @data[x]
  end

  def y(y)
    @data[y]
  end

  def []=(x, y, value)
    @data[x][y] = value
  end
end

# TILES
class Tile
  # Types = ["l", "w", "r"]
  attr_accessor :type
  def initialize(type)
    @type = type
  end

  def set(string)
    @type = string
  end
  def to_s
     @type
  end
end

# REAL ACTION HERE
def generate 
  h = 20
  w = 20
  i = 0
  worldmap = Map.new(20, 20)
  while i < h do
    n = 0
    while n < w do
      worldmap.[] = (i, n, Tile.new("w"))
      n = n + 1 
    end
    i = i + 1
  end 

  gen(worldmap)
  look(worldmap)
end

def look(map)
  z = 0
  b = 0
  c = 0
  string = " "
  while b < 20 do
    while z < 20 do  
      string = string + map.[](b, z).to_s
      z = z + 1
    end 
    b = b + 1 
    puts string
    c = c + 1
  end
end

def gen(map)
  circle_amount = 1

  i = 0
  x = 0
  y = 0
  while i < circle_amount do 
    #select a center
   cy = (rand(1..20))
   cx = (rand(1..20))
   center = map.[](cx,cy)
   center.set("C")

   radius = 4
   puts cy.to_s + " " +  cx.to_s

   while y < 20
     while x < 20
       offsetY = y - cy 
       offsetX = x - cx 
       distance = offsetY**2 + offsetX**2
       if distance <= radius**2 then 
           tile = map.[](y, x)
           tile.set("l") # I DID IT
         end
       x = x + 1
     end
      y = y + 1
   end
   i = i + 1
  end
end

generate 

Here are the examples of output

wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww wwwwwwwwwwwwlllllwww

C:/Users/borya/Documents/NetBeansProjects/LearningPurporse/lib/main.rb:7:in []': >undefined method[]' for nil:NilClass (NoMethodError)

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by sawa, eugen, Roger Lindsjö, Mathias Müller, fedorqui Mar 3 at 9:26

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Having a x and y method that do the same thing is weird. The looping is somewhat counter-Rubyish. The worldmap.[] is unnecessary, just use worldmap[]--that's the point of being able to redefine operators like that. If you think the math is wrong, how have you approached debugging it? Overall, I find the code difficult to reason about as it stands. –  Dave Newton Oct 5 '12 at 21:27
    
worldmap.[] = (i, n, Tile.new("w")) makes no sense; worldmap[i, n] = Tile.new('w') does. –  Dave Newton Oct 5 '12 at 21:32
    
Your random numbers go from 1-20 while your indices go from 0-19. –  Dave Newton Oct 5 '12 at 21:36
    
It won't work. worldmap[i, n] = Tile.new('w') Try it yourself. It's not like I used that just because I find it more beautyful or matching the golden ray –  Борис Цейтлин Oct 5 '12 at 21:36
    
Also, your look method is broken--you can't tell, because you overwrote to_s, so you can't see the object's ID, which is a big clue in this case. –  Dave Newton Oct 5 '12 at 22:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
 > m = Map.new(5,5)
 => #<Map:0x007fa5d9838fc0 @data=[[nil, nil, nil, nil, nil], [nil, nil, nil, nil, nil], [nil, nil, nil, nil, nil], [nil, nil, nil, nil, nil], [nil, nil, nil, nil, nil]]> 
ruby-1.9.3-p125 :040 > m[1,1]="hi"
(x=1, y=1) = hi
@data[x][y]=hi
 => "hi" 
 > m
 => #<Map:0x007fa5d9838fc0 @data=[[nil, nil, nil, nil, nil], [nil, "hi", nil, nil, nil], [nil, nil, nil, nil, nil], [nil, nil, nil, nil, nil], [nil, nil, nil, nil, nil]]> 

I'd probably code this something closer to the below, although it's a bit off-the cuff, and I preserved some of your original code even when it might not be how I would have done it.

class Map
  attr_reader :data, :x, :y

  def initialize(x, y)
    @x = x
    @y = y
    @data = Array.new(x) { Array.new(y) }
  end

  def set(&block)
    (0..x-1).each do |i|
      (0..y-1).each do |j|
        result = yield i, j, @data[i][j]
        @data[i][j] = result if result
      end
    end
  end

  def [](x, y)
    @data[x][y]
  end

  def []=(x, y, value)
    @data[x][y] = value
  end

  def dump
    (0..x-1).each do |i|
      string = ""
      (0..y-1).each do |j|
        string += "#{self[i, j]} "
      end
      puts string
    end
  end
end

def generate 
  map = Map.new(20, 20)
  map.set { |x, y, at| Tile.new('w') }
  gen(map)
end

def gen(map)
  3.times do |i|
    cy = rand(0..map.x-1)
    cx = rand(0..map.y-1)
    puts "cx=#{cx}, cy=#{cy}"
    map[cx, cy].set('C')
    map.dump

    radius = 3.0

    map.set do |x, y, at|
      offsetX = x - cx
      offsetY = y - cy
      distance = Math.sqrt(offsetY**2 + offsetX**2)
      distance.abs <= radius ? '.' : false
    end

    puts ''
    map.dump
  end
end

Once you fix your math, you can end up with something like this:

w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w . w w 
w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w . . . . . 
w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w . . . . . 
w w w w w w w w w w w w w w . . . . . . 
w w w w w . w w w w w w w w w . . . . . 
w w w . . . . . w w w w w w w . . . . . 
w w w . . . . . w w w w w w w w w . w w 
w w . . . . . . . w w w w w w w w w w w 
w w w . . . . . w w w w w w w w w w w w 
w w w . . . . . w w w w w w w w w w w w 
w w w w w . w w w w w w w w w w w w w w 
w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w 
w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w 
w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w 
w w w w w w w w w w w w . w w w w w w w 
w w w w w w w w w w . . . . . w w w w w 
w w w w w w w w w w . . . . . w w w w w 
w w w w w w w w w . . . . . . . w w w w 
w w w w w w w w w w . . . . . w w w w w 
w w w w w w w w w w . . . . . w w w w w 

Caveat: this code is above your skill-level, you may wish to translate it back into while-loops with the extra verbosity until you're further along.

Boris, your original code was difficult to reason about, for a number of reasons, including the random indentation/formatting and simple syntax errors. It's important to format your code consistently. Doing so enables both you, and others, to read it more easily.

It's important to become familiar with the paradigms of the language you're using. In general, if Ruby code has while-loops, counter increments, etc. when they're not really used for anything other than indexing, it's a code smell. Canonical Ruby tends towards a more functional style using .each, blocks, and so on.

You were correct that your math was wrong, although I suspect you weren't aware just how wrong it was. Math like this is really easy to debug: do it by hand. Draw a grid. Take the program's (cx, cy) and do the calculation by hand. Do some sanity checks to make sure what you think you're doing is (a) what you're actually doing, and (b) sensical.

For example, your distances were in the hundreds sometimes. Clearly that makes no sense when your grid is (20, 20)... once you see that, the solution is obvious–you omitted a step.

The same logic can be used for the rest of the math issues.

Play computer... be the computer. Follow its steps, on paper. There is no faster path to understanding than internalizing what's actually happening "underneath the screen".

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the help! –  Борис Цейтлин Oct 6 '12 at 12:30

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