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I have a very basic data model after trimming down an application to dig up the performance problems i'm facing. The data model exists of two entities, for the example callend Product and Category:

class Product {
    public virtual int ID {get;set;}
    public virtual string Name {get;set;}
    public virtual int CategoryID {get;set;}
    public virtual Category Category {get;set;}
}

class Category {
    public virtual int ID {get;set;}
    public virtual string Name {get;set;}
}

When I add 100 new products, all having their reference set to the same category using the CategoryID property, and I call db.SaveChanges() it can take quite some time. I was able to reduce the required time by setting the AutoDetectChangesEnabled to false. But after a couple of more runs I noticed that the amount of time required to insert the 100 new products increases when the amount of products present in the database increase:

23416 -->  +/- 7000 ms
25516 -->  +/- 7500 ms

Because I know the table is going to get a lot bigger in production I would like to know what my options are before I fall back to using raw Sql queries or BulkInsert.

In response to the comments of Stanley and Raphaël:

In my test case both the ID properties are primary keys and the CategoryID has an index. There are no triggers etc.

I'm executing a loop 100 times, in which I initialize a new DbContext, insert 100 products and dispose the DbContext.

To be clear: I can create a new project, set up EF with SqlCe, build the data model literally as above using Code-First and get the same results.

After conducting a couple of other tests, it seems that the problem lies around Sql Server Compact Edition. Using regular MSSQL server, the observerd preformance problems are gone, inserting 100 rows now consistently takes around 50ms. Altough I now seem to have found the source of the problem, it still doesn't answer why inserting 100 rows in a compact database using an external query tool doesn't have the same preformance issues as when I insert 100 rows using the EF.

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1  
Do you have any indexes on the tables (specifically a clustered index)? Are there any triggers or any other things that would activate on an insert or update? –  D Stanley Oct 5 '12 at 21:23
    
Do you dispose your context between two "100 products insertions" ? Is the 100 insert at the same time a normal scenario in production, or just a test one ? –  Raphaël Althaus Oct 5 '12 at 21:27
    
Please see the edit –  zeebonk Oct 5 '12 at 21:37
1  
Are you are using MS SQL Server? If so, do you see any wait times greater than a few milliseconds on the Activity Monitor, while you're executing this? If so, what is the wait_type? –  andes Oct 5 '12 at 21:51
1  
@zeebonk: I would suggest capturing the insert statements and testing them directly against your database to see whether it's actually Entity Framework causing this behavior, or whether it's the database itself. –  StriplingWarrior Oct 5 '12 at 21:56

1 Answer 1

I've used Entity Framework for ETL before, and ran into memory consumption issues, even though I was diligent about disposing my context. I found that running garbage collection as part of my routine reduced the memory consumption, but only in part.

I am not aware of a way to avoid the n+1 anti-pattern when using Entity Framework for bulk inserts or updates. If this scenario of loading hundreds or thousands of records is something you can control and would do seldom, you could try this:

using (MyDbContext db = new MyDbContext())
{
    // prep your records and add them to your context

    // Save the records
    db.SaveChanges
}

GC.Collect();
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
GC.Collect();

This worked for me because ETL was a one-time load and we had time to stretch it over a couple days. I wouldn't push something like this into Production, especially if you intend to allow users or systems out of your control have access to do bulk inserts.

My team ended up using EF for transactional use only, and we have a separate data access layer for bulk loading, integration and reporting.

My approach to this problem, while trying to keep with model-driven development, is to leverage the xml datatype in SQL Server. I prepare objects as part of an ICollection, serialize them as XML, and then send that string as a parameter to a stored procedure like this:

create procedure [dbo].[BulkAddProducts]
        @Values xml = null
    as begin
        insert into dbo.Products
            select
                    Products.Product.value('*:Name[1]', 'nvarchar(512)') as Name
                    ,Products.Product.value('*:CategoryID[1]', 'int') as CateogryID
                from @Values.nodes(N'/*:ArrayOfProduct/*:Product') Products(Product)
    end
go

Here is a working example of the query without a proc:

declare @Val xml = '
<ArrayOfProduct xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/MyAppName.Models">
    <Product>
        <Name>Product1</Name>
        <CategoryID>5</CategoryID>
    </Product>
    <Product>
        <Name>Product2</Name>
        <CategoryID>5</CategoryID>
    </Product>
</ArrayOfProduct>
'
select
        Products.Product.value('*:Name[1]', 'nvarchar(512)') as Name
        ,Products.Product.value('*:CategoryID[1]', 'int') as CateogryID
    from @Val.nodes(N'/*:ArrayOfProduct/*:Product') Products(Product)
go
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If you end up running into problems with serializing Entity Framework's proxy objects, one solution is to map your EF models to a similar model suited to this purpose. I use the omu value injector for that: valueinjecter.codeplex.com. –  andes Oct 5 '12 at 23:59
    
Thanks for your answer andes. Calling the garbage collector manually indeed seems to get rid of the observed memory leak. However it doesn't seem to help with the performance problems. I'll update my quetion with everything discussed in the comments and my complete test setup. –  zeebonk Oct 6 '12 at 7:23

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