Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using the a Amazon Perl module that returns a reference to an array of hash references as $record_sets, containing record set data and I'm having a hard time dereferencing it. I can print the data using data dumper but I need to be able to manipulate the data. Below is the documentation provided for the module

Thanks In Advance:

#list_resource_record_sets
#Lists resource record sets for a hosted zone.
#Called in scalar context:

$record_sets = $r53->list_resource_record_sets(zone_id => '123ZONEID');

#Returns: A reference to an array of hash references, containing record set data. Example:

$record_sets = [
{
name => 'example.com.',
type => 'MX'
ttl => 86400,
records => [
'10 mail.example.com'
]
},
{
name => 'example.com.',
type => 'NS',
ttl => 172800,
records => [
'ns-001.awsdns-01.net.',
'ns-002.awsdns-02.net.',
'ns-003.awsdns-03.net.',
'ns-004.awsdns-04.net.'
]
share|improve this question
    
Note that there is a comma missing after the type => 'MX'. –  choroba Oct 5 '12 at 21:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you have a array-reference, e.g. $x = ['a','b','c'], you can dereference it two ways.

print $x->[0]; # prints a
print $x->[1]; # prints b
print $x->[2]; # prints c

@y = @{$x}; # convert the array-ref to an array (copies the underlying array)
print $y[0]; # prints a
print $y[1]; # prints b
print $y[2]; # prints c

A hash-ref works the same, except it uses curly braces. E.g. $x = {a => 1, b => 2, c => 3}.

print $x->{a}; # prints 1
print $x->{b}; # prints 2
print $x->{c}; # prints 3

%y = %{$x}; # convert the hash-ref to a hash (copies the underlying hash)
print $y{a}; # prints 1
print $y{b}; # prints 2
print $y{c}; # prints 3

Applying this to your example, which has nested structures you can do this.

for my $x ( @{$record_sets} ) {
  print $x->{name}, "\n";
  print $x->{type}, "\n";

  for my $y ( @{$x->{records}} ) {
    print $y, "\n";
  }
}

# or something more direct
print $record_sets->[0]->{name}, "\n";
print $record_sets->[0]->{records}->[1], "\n";
share|improve this answer

$record_sets is an array reference. To dereference it, you can use

my @array = @{ $record_sets };

Each record set is a hash reference.

for my $record_set ( @{ $record_sets } ) {
    my $set = %{ $record_set };
}

For example, to get the names and records (array ref):

for my $record_set ( @{ $record_sets } ) {
    print $record_set->{name},
          ': ',
          join ', ', @{ $record_set->{records} };
    print "\n";
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.