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I've got a query that I am trying to write that displays the MOST RECENT StatusID data from the Action table.

Here's what my database looks like (Screenshot from SQL Server 2008):

screenshot

From my sample data, you can see that the Action table contains two (2) entries for RequestID #26. I only want to display the most recent StatusID value (based on the DateStamp field).

screenshot2

I have created a View for my database. It is nasty looking, and bumps up onto my SQL writing ability.

SELECT
  P.ID AS PacketID, R.ID AS RequestID, A.ID AS ActionID, A.EmpID, P.DateStamp,
  RQ.Description AS RequestType, L.Description AS Line, R.PartNo, R.Workorder,
  R.Qty, RZ.Description AS ReasonType, R.MTF, S.Description AS Status
FROM Packet AS P
  LEFT OUTER JOIN Request AS R ON R.PacketID = P.ID
  INNER JOIN Action AS A ON A.RequestID = R.ID
  INNER JOIN RequestType AS RQ ON R.RequestTypeID = RQ.ID
  INNER JOIN Line AS L ON R.LineID = L.ID
  INNER JOIN ReasonType AS RZ ON R.ReasonTypeID = RZ.ID
  INNER JOIN Status AS S ON A.StatusID = S.ID

This View, however, is showing ALL of the values, and I need it to somehow only pull the most recent row for any given Action.

How would I modify my View to do this?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can create a derived table from the Action table that grabs the max DateStamp grouped by RequestID (this will give you the latest DateStamp for each RequestID). After you have the derived table, you can join it back to the Action table on the row from the Action table that has the matching latest DateStamp for a given RequestID.

SELECT
P.ID AS PacketID, R.ID AS RequestID, A.ID AS ActionID, A.EmpID, P.DateStamp,
RQ.Description AS RequestType, L.Description AS Line, R.PartNo, R.Workorder,
R.Qty, RZ.Description AS ReasonType, R.MTF, S.Description AS Status
FROM Packet AS P
LEFT OUTER JOIN Request AS R ON R.PacketID = P.ID

INNER JOIN
(SELECT RequestID, MAX(DateStamp) AS MostRecentDateStamp
 FROM Action GROUP BY RequestID) AS MostRecentAction
ON R.ID = MostRecentAction.RequestID

INNER JOIN Action AS A 
ON 
MostRecentAction.RequestID = A.RequestID
AND
MostRecentAction.MostRecentDateStamp = A.DateStamp

INNER JOIN RequestType AS RQ ON R.RequestTypeID = RQ.ID
INNER JOIN Line AS L ON R.LineID = L.ID
INNER JOIN ReasonType AS RZ ON R.ReasonTypeID = RZ.ID
INNER JOIN Status AS S ON A.StatusID = S.ID

or, another option would be to take the approach shown by Mr. Karwin here: Join single row from a table in MySQL

SELECT
P.ID AS PacketID, R.ID AS RequestID, A.ID AS ActionID, A.EmpID, P.DateStamp,
RQ.Description AS RequestType, L.Description AS Line, R.PartNo, R.Workorder,
R.Qty, RZ.Description AS ReasonType, R.MTF, S.Description AS Status
FROM Packet AS P
LEFT OUTER JOIN Request AS R ON R.PacketID = P.ID

INNER JOIN Action AS A 
ON 
R.ID = A.RequestID

LEFT JOIN Action AS A2
ON
A.RequestID = A2.RequestID
AND
A.DateStamp < A2.DateStamp

INNER JOIN RequestType AS RQ ON R.RequestTypeID = RQ.ID
INNER JOIN Line AS L ON R.LineID = L.ID
INNER JOIN ReasonType AS RZ ON R.ReasonTypeID = RZ.ID
INNER JOIN Status AS S ON A.StatusID = S.ID

WHERE A2.RequestID IS NULL

I like the approach Mr. Karwin uses, especially when dealing with ties with a structure like you have:

SELECT
P.ID AS PacketID, R.ID AS RequestID, A.ID AS ActionID, A.EmpID, P.DateStamp,
RQ.Description AS RequestType, L.Description AS Line, R.PartNo, R.Workorder,
R.Qty, RZ.Description AS ReasonType, R.MTF, S.Description AS Status
FROM Packet AS P
LEFT OUTER JOIN Request AS R ON R.PacketID = P.ID

INNER JOIN Action AS A 
ON 
R.ID = A.RequestID

LEFT JOIN Action AS A2
ON
A.RequestID = A2.RequestID
AND
(A.DateStamp < A2.DateStamp OR (A.DateStamp = A2.DateStamp AND A1.RequestID < A2.RequestID))

INNER JOIN RequestType AS RQ ON R.RequestTypeID = RQ.ID
INNER JOIN Line AS L ON R.LineID = L.ID
INNER JOIN ReasonType AS RZ ON R.ReasonTypeID = RZ.ID
INNER JOIN Status AS S ON A.StatusID = S.ID

WHERE A2.RequestID IS NULL
share|improve this answer
    
This seems like the best solution for my situation. My only cavet with using it is that I am not comfortable with my level of understanding of INNER, LEFT, and OUTER JOINs. If I ever had to edit this View, I would not understand what was going on! But, I really like it! –  jp2code Oct 8 '12 at 15:13
1  
@jp2code - In the first solution, an INNER JOIN is used because it is guaranteed there will be a matching row as the GROUP BY is being joined against a table it was derived from. In the second solution, a LEFT JOIN is used because when the table is joined against itself, the join condition states: join a row where there is a greater timestamp than the one in this row - and when that condition can't be met (on the row with the greatest DateStamp), then you have found what you are looking for (A2.RequestID will be null), and you pick this one out with the WHERE clause. –  dugas Oct 8 '12 at 16:47
    
Many great answers to this, and a +1 to all. In the end, I selected this version because I like its style best. Is it better, worse or equal to the other versions with nested queries? I really don't know. –  jp2code Oct 9 '12 at 14:36
SELECT
  P.ID AS PacketID, R.ID AS RequestID, A.ID AS ActionID, A.EmpID, P.DateStamp,
  RQ.Description AS RequestType, L.Description AS Line, R.PartNo, R.Workorder,
  R.Qty, RZ.Description AS ReasonType, R.MTF, S.Description AS Status
FROM Packet AS P
  LEFT OUTER JOIN Request AS R ON R.PacketID = P.ID
  INNER JOIN Action AS A ON A.RequestID = R.ID
  INNER JOIN RequestType AS RQ ON R.RequestTypeID = RQ.ID
  INNER JOIN Line AS L ON R.LineID = L.ID
  INNER JOIN ReasonType AS RZ ON R.ReasonTypeID = RZ.ID
  INNER JOIN Status AS S ON A.StatusID = S.ID
where A.StatusID = (
    select top 1 StatusID
    from Action
    where RequestID = R.ID
    order by DateStamp desc
    )
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think A.StatusID is unique, shouldn't you use timestamp? –  Hogan Oct 6 '12 at 3:34
    
+1. This does pull the result I was after. Does a SELECT TOP 1 subquery process faster than including an additional INNER JOIN as dugas' answer shows? –  jp2code Oct 8 '12 at 15:08
1  
@jp2code it would go faster but it is also wrong in some (edge?) cases. –  Hogan Oct 8 '12 at 16:19

To achive what you want, you can join to a subquery grouping the results by the packetID and selecting the MAX(ID) for each packetID. This works because ID field is an identity column and so and the highest number will always be the most recent. This is preferable over comparing on a timestamp because ints (especially indexed ints) are far faster to compare than timestamps.

SELECT
  P.ID AS PacketID, R.ID AS RequestID, A.ID AS ActionID, A.EmpID, P.DateStamp,
  RQ.Description AS RequestType, L.Description AS Line, R.PartNo, R.Workorder,
  R.Qty, RZ.Description AS ReasonType, R.MTF, S.Description AS Status
FROM Packet AS P
  LEFT OUTER JOIN (SELECT MAX(ID) as ID FROM Request GROUP BY PacketID) as UR ON P.ID = UR.ID
  INNER JOIN Request AS R ON R.PacketID = UR.ID
  INNER JOIN Action AS A ON A.RequestID = R.ID
  INNER JOIN RequestType AS RQ ON R.RequestTypeID = RQ.ID
  INNER JOIN Line AS L ON R.LineID = L.ID
  INNER JOIN ReasonType AS RZ ON R.ReasonTypeID = RZ.ID
  INNER JOIN Status AS S ON A.StatusID = S.ID
share|improve this answer
    
Max(ID) does not work see the example data. (27>26 but has an earlier timestamp) –  Hogan Oct 6 '12 at 3:27
    
+1. Thanks for the work, but this returned 0 rows. FYI: It also appears the site spencerdrager is down. –  jp2code Oct 8 '12 at 15:05

I typically use rank() to get the latest version of a record, based on time. It will assign a rank to each version of a record, based on the key you provide (the partition: in this case the request id). If you order by desc, the rows with a rank of 1 are the newest. If you order by asc, the rows with a rank of 1 are the oldest.

EDIT : Changed the name of the RequestId column that was returned in the subquery, to remove the error you were seeing.

SELECT
    P.ID AS PacketID, R.ID AS RequestID, A.ID AS ActionID, A.EmpID, P.DateStamp,
    RQ.Description AS RequestType, L.Description AS Line, R.PartNo, R.Workorder,
    R.Qty, RZ.Description AS ReasonType, R.MTF, S.Description AS Status
FROM Packet AS P
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Request AS R ON R.PacketID = P.ID
    INNER JOIN (
        select 
                req.ID as RequestIdForJoin
                , act.*
                , rank() over (partition by req.ID order by act.DateStamp desc) as [Rank]
            from Request as req 
                inner join Action as act on req.ID = act.RequestID
    ) as A
        on R.ID = A.RequestIdForJoin
    INNER JOIN RequestType AS RQ ON R.RequestTypeID = RQ.ID
    INNER JOIN Line AS L ON R.LineID = L.ID
    INNER JOIN ReasonType AS RZ ON R.ReasonTypeID = RZ.ID
    INNER JOIN Status AS S ON A.StatusID = S.ID         
    where A.[Rank] = 1 

For Duplicate Actions: If @Hogan's scenario of multiple actions with the same timestamp is possible, you can stage and then remove duplicates like this:

declare @View table (
PacketID int, RequestID int, ActionID int, EmpID int, DateStamp datetime,
RequestType int, Line int, PartNo varchar(50), Workorder int, Qty int, 
ReasonType int, MTF varchar(50), Status int
)

insert into @View       
SELECT
    P.ID AS PacketID, R.ID AS RequestID, A.ID AS ActionID, A.EmpID, P.DateStamp,
    RQ.Description AS RequestType, L.Description AS Line, R.PartNo, R.Workorder,
    R.Qty, RZ.Description AS ReasonType, R.MTF, S.Description AS Status
FROM Packet AS P
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Request AS R ON R.PacketID = P.ID
    INNER JOIN (
        select 
                req.ID as RequestIdForJoin
                , act.*
                , rank() over (partition by req.ID order by act.DateStamp desc) as [Rank]
            from Request as req 
                inner join Action as act on req.ID = act.RequestID
    ) as A
        on R.ID = A.RequestIdForJoin
    INNER JOIN RequestType AS RQ ON R.RequestTypeID = RQ.ID
    INNER JOIN Line AS L ON R.LineID = L.ID
    INNER JOIN ReasonType AS RZ ON R.ReasonTypeID = RZ.ID
    INNER JOIN Status AS S ON A.StatusID = S.ID         
    where A.[Rank] = 1  

-- Removing all but one duplicate
;with dups as (
    select 
        RequestID
        ,row_number() over (partition by RequestID order by DateStamp) as [RowNumber]
    from @View
)
delete dups where [RowNumber] > 1

select * from @View
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Like Hogan's answer, I get the same error about RequestID being specified multiple times for A. Is this for after SQL Server 2008? –  jp2code Oct 8 '12 at 15:03
1  
That just means that a column named 'RequestId' was being returned twice for the subquery, 'A'. I renamed the 'RequestId' so it is unique - this should work now. –  andes Oct 8 '12 at 15:42
    
Thanks! I don't use SQL often enough to be good at debugging errors in it like I am with Windows Forms. –  jp2code Oct 8 '12 at 15:49

This will work.

WITH MaxDate AS
(
   SELECT RequestID, Max(DateStamp) AS MaxDate
   FROM Action
   GROUP BY RequestID
), ActionFiltered AS
(
   SELECT Action.* 
   FROM Action
   JOIN MaxDate ON Action.RequestID=MaxDate.RequestID AND Action.DateStamp = MaxDate.MaxDate
)
SELECT
    P.ID AS PacketID, R.ID AS RequestID, A.ID AS ActionID, A.EmpID, P.DateStamp,
    RQ.Description AS RequestType, L.Description AS Line, R.PartNo, R.Workorder,
    R.Qty, RZ.Description AS ReasonType, R.MTF, S.Description AS Status
FROM ActionFiltered A
JOIN Request AS R ON A.RequestID = R.ID 
JOIN Packet AS P ON P.ID = R.PacketID
JOIN RequestType AS RQ ON R.RequestTypeID = RQ.ID
JOIN Line AS L ON R.LineID = L.ID
JOIN ReasonType AS RZ ON R.ReasonTypeID = RZ.ID
JOIN Status AS S ON A.StatusID = S.ID

Here is what I'm doing: First, for each requestID I find the most current date (MaxDate), then I get all the data from action table for those rows (ActionFiltered), finally I join all of that back to your tables with inner joins.

Potential problem: If you have two records in the Action table with the same requestID and timestamp you will get two rows in the final table.

Note: I did not test so there may be typos.

share|improve this answer
    
That is interesting. I do not currently use any WITH statements as I am recently migrating to SQL Server 2008 from SQL 2000. When I attempt to run the query, however, I get the message, "Msg 8156, Level 16, State 1, Line 7: The column 'RequestID' was specified multiple times for 'ActionFiltered'." I did not state SQL 2008, so this could be a feature for an even newer version. –  jp2code Oct 8 '12 at 14:58
    
@jp2code: Nope, typo on my part, change it to SELECT Action.*. I've changed the answer, thanks for the catch –  Hogan Oct 8 '12 at 16:16

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