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supposing I have:

class A {
  //field, properties and common methods
}

class B : A {
  //specific ones
}

class C : A {
  //specific ones
}

class D : A {
  //specific ones
}

and then these 3 lists:

List<B> b_list = new List<B>();
List<C> c_list = new List<C>();
List<D> d_list = new List<D>();

I need a lists that points to b_list, c_list and d_list. Is it possible considering that classes B, C, D have the same superclass A?

Something like:

List<A>[] lists = new[] {b_list, c_list, d_list};

Thank you

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Those are lists, not arrays. There are important differences. –  Abe Miessler Oct 5 '12 at 22:54

4 Answers 4

You want to treat List<B>, List<C>, and List<D> as subclasses of List<A>, but they are not. Their only common supertype is object.

In .NET 4 and later, you can reference-convert these types all to IEnumerable<A>, because the IEnumerable<out T> interface is covariant in T. In .NET 4.5, two more covariant interfaces were added: IReadOnlyList<out T> and IReadOnlyCollection<out T>, so you could also treat these as IReadOnlyList<A> and IReadOnlyCollection<A>. One of these interfaces might suit your needs.

Classes cannot be covariant in .NET, and interfaces can only be covariant in a type parameter if that type parameter is only used in "output" positions. In other words, the method IList<T>.Add(T item) prevents IList<> from being covariant.

So, you can do this, assuming .NET 4.5:

IReadOnlyList<A>[] lists = new[] {b_list, c_list, d_list};

In .NET 4, you could do this, which is considerably less useful, but might be enough for your needs:

IEnumerable<A>[] lists = new[] {b_list, c_list, d_list};
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I wouldn't say the IEnumerable<T> version is considerably less useful. You can still use LINQ (including ElementAt()) and doing that should also be fast, because LINQ implementation does check for IList<T> and uses it if possible. –  svick Oct 6 '12 at 1:30
    
@svick But if the list is a List<B> and you call ((IEnumerable<A>)theList).ElementAt(index), the code will check whether the object implements IList<A>, which it does not, so it will enumerate the list to get the element. –  phoog Oct 8 '12 at 22:10
    
Hmm, you're right, I didn't think it through. –  svick Oct 8 '12 at 22:36

Not directly (covariance "limitation")

But you can do

List<A> superTypeList = 
   b_array.Cast<A>()
   .Concat(c_array.Cast<A>())
   .Concat(d_array.Cast<A>())
   .ToList();
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The question doesn't ask for a list containing all the items from the three lists, it asks for a list (or array) of lists. –  svick Oct 6 '12 at 1:24

You have to make a list of list of A and assign b, c, d object to it. You have to cast the subclass objects to parent class A. This will make limitation and you will be to access only the properties and methods etc which are inherited from base class.

List<B> blist = new List<B>();
List<C> cList = new List<C>();
List<D> dList = new List<D>();

List<List<A>> arrays = new List<List<A>>();    
arrays.Add(b_array.ConvertAll(c=>(A)c));;
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and don't I lose the specific fields/methods/properties only declared in the B/C/D class? –  Frank Lioty Oct 5 '12 at 23:16
    
Updated my answer. –  Adil Oct 5 '12 at 23:19
    
@FrankLioty yes, you would have to cast the A-references back to B, C, or D as appropriate. –  phoog Oct 5 '12 at 23:27
    
This answer is a good example of polymorphism. –  Colin Pear Oct 5 '12 at 23:31

A better approach is to use a design pattern called the Composite Pattern.

Essentially you create a base class (Component) with all the methods that you want your Child nodes (either Compisites Nodes if they in turn have children or Leaf Nodes if they stop branching out) to have and then implement only the methods you want each one to make use of in each of the child types.

In your case you might do this:

abstract class A {   
    //All methods for all classes
    //ex.
    public abstract void b();
    public abstract void c();
    public abstract void d();
}  

class B : A {   
    public override void b()
    {
        //Do Something
    }
    public override void c()
    {
        throw new Exception("Not Implemented");
    }
    public override void d()
    {
        throw new Exception("Not Implemented");
    }
}  

class C : A {   
    public override void b()
    {
        throw new Exception("Not Implemented");
    }
    public override void c()
    {
        //Do Something
    }
    public override void d()
    {
        throw new Exception("Not Implemented");
    }
}  

class D : A {   
    public override void b()
    {
        throw new Exception("Not Implemented");
    }
    public override void c()
    {
        throw new Exception("Not Implemented");
    }
    public override void d()
    {
        //Do Something
    }
}

Then according to the laws of Polymorphism if you do something like the following then the methods of the derived classes (b,c,d, etc.) should be preserved.

List<B> blist = new List<B>(); 
List<C> cList = new List<C>(); 
List<D> dList = new List<D>();  
List<List<A>> arrays = new List<List<A>>();
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