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I have a class that is templated with ints (i.e.:

template </*...*/, int a> /*...*/

). In my class, I would like a constructor that takes exactly "a" arguments. I can of course make it variadic, but I'd like compile-time checks on length if possible. I also think macro hacks could work, but I'm starting by looking for built-in C++ functionality.

Is this possible in C++, and how can it done if so?

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You can do compile-time checks on the length with sizeof.... –  chris Oct 6 '12 at 0:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Dealing with a sequence of values of the same type is what arrays are for.

You don't even need to use raw arrays; with C++11 you can use std::array.

E.g. like so:

template< int a >
class MyClass
{
public:
    MyClass( std::array< int, a > const& args )
    {}
};

If your compiler doesn't offer std::array then you can very easily define a corresponding class, or you can just use a raw array:

template< int a >
class MyClass
{
public:
    MyClass( int const (&args)[a] )
    {}
};

Hm, I hope I got the placement of & correct there. For some reason that I can't fathom, I always forget that syntax. No matter how many times I've used it.


Given that the OP clarifies in a comment that (1) he doesn't have C++11 and (2) he wants simple declaration syntax like

MyClass<4> m(0,1,2,3);

one possibility is to make MyClass an aggregate that can be initialized by C++03 curly braces initializer, i.e., no user defined constructor:

#include <stddef.h>

typedef ptrdiff_t Size;
typedef Size Index;

template< Size a >
class MyClass
{
public:
    static Size const n = a;
    static Size size() { return n; }

    int elems_[n];
    int operator[]( Index const i ) const { return elems_[i]; }
    int& operator[]( Index const i ) { return elems_[i]; }
};

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    MyClass< 3 > x = {100, 200, 300};
    for( int i = 0;  i < x.size(); ++i )
    {
        wcout << x[i] << endl;
    }
}

If this solution is acceptable then it's essentially to reimplement std::array.

share|improve this answer
1  
I never forget the syntax because only the right syntax plays out with this fully mental mnemonic: c-faq.com/decl/spiral.anderson.html. If you haven't seen that or bothered to look at it in detail, I hope you do, and I hope it helps. –  chris Oct 6 '12 at 1:08
1  
std::array is not available. For the second, it looks like exactly what I want, but I'm having trouble defining it right. The spiral trick looks cool, but I'm not even sure what the above is (exactly) doing? To be clear, I want to be able to do something like "MyClass<4> m(0,1,2,3);". Thanks, –  imallett Oct 6 '12 at 1:27
    
@IanMallett: the code given turned out to have the & correctly placed, so that's OK. it only covers your original question about functionality. what you now ask for is about creating syntax, and that requires much more complex solution (you have convenient syntax directly in C++11, but since you don't have std::array you don't have C++11). one only creates syntax for very good reason, e.g. in boost component meant to be reused zillions of times. even then, it can be difficult to relate to for client code programmers. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 6 '12 at 8:36
    
Okay, so it wasn't magically going to give me new syntax, as I thought your above code might. I think the initializer list is probably almost as good for me. Thanks for the help, –  imallett Oct 6 '12 at 16:55

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