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The changes to auto-rotation in iOS 6 seems to have made this incredibly difficult, or impossible. They seem to be pushing the philosophy that a child view controller should not have to override the auto-rotation behavior of its parent view controller. This makes it difficult to accomplish what I am trying to do:

  • I have a view controller that must be displayed portrait.
  • It pushes another view controller modally that is a simple image viewer, but I want this view controller to be able to rotate to any portrait or landscape orientation (for obvious reasons)
  • When the child view controller is dismissed (regardless of its current orientation), the parent view controller should remain in portrait orientation

Relevant Apple Documentation from UIViewController class reference

In iOS 6, your app supports the interface orientations defined in your app’s Info.plist file. A view controller can override the supportedInterfaceOrientations method to limit the list of supported orientations. Generally, the system calls this method only on the root view controller of the window or a view controller presented to fill the entire screen; child view controllers use the portion of the window provided for them by their parent view controller and no longer participate in directly in decisions about what rotations are supported. The intersection of the app’s orientation mask and the view controller’s orientation mask is used to determine which orientations a view controller can be rotated into.

I've thought about using transforms to simulate rotation in the child view controller, but honestly, I feel like there should be a better way, and would like to avoid that if at all possible.

It seems that any in order for any child view controller to support an interface orientation, its parent view controller (presented modally or otherwise) must now also support that interface orientation.

Am I missing something simple here? Is this as ridiculous as it seems?

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Your question says that you both "push" (implying navigation) but "dismiss" (implying modal presentation). I believe modal presentation ought to work as long as it is "presented to fill the entire screen", as the documentation you quote says. –  tc. Oct 9 '12 at 1:42
    
You're right. I should clarify that ultimately I'd like to achieve this with either pushing onto the navigation stack or modal presentation. My current dilemma is specifically for modal presentation, though. I am presenting it to fill the entire screen, and when I dismiss the modal view controller, the view underneath has been rotated, regardless of the supportedInterfaceOrientations mask. My problem may be caused by the fact that I have overriden the supportedInterfaceOrientations function in my app's custom UINavigationController similar to what was suggested by Robotic Cat below. –  Preston Lewis Oct 10 '12 at 1:16
    
Don't do that then! –  tc. Oct 12 '12 at 22:02

2 Answers 2

You could subclass the Navigation Controller and override the (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations method. So the Navigation Controller will always return whatever the currently shown view controller supports.

Something like below (code and idea not tested):

- (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations {
    return [self.presentedViewController supportedInterfaceOrientations];
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've actually already done this in my app. The problem with rotating the entire navigation controller is that when the topmost view controller is dismissed, the underlying view controller is still rotated, as it's a part of the (now rotated) navigation controller's hierarchy. What I'm looking for is a way to rotate the top/visible view controller without having to rotate its parent. –  Preston Lewis Oct 6 '12 at 2:49

I'm dealing with similiar problem today and got to this:

In parent view I check if the child is allocated (and thus shown in my case). If yes the code allows any orientation, if no then only landscape. Something like:

in parent:

- (BOOL)shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)interfaceOrientation {

    bool result;

    if (self.photoViewController)
    {
        result = YES;
    }
    else
    {
        result = (interfaceOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft) || (interfaceOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight);
    }

    return result;
}

- (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations
{
    NSUInteger result;

    if (self.photoViewController)
    {
        result = UIInterfaceOrientationMaskAll;
    }
    else
    {
        result = UIInterfaceOrientationMaskLandscapeLeft+UIInterfaceOrientationMaskLandscapeRight;
    }

    return result;
}

in child this functions look a bit different:

- (BOOL)shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)interfaceOrientation {

    return YES;
}

- (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations
{
    return UIInterfaceOrientationMaskAll;
}

This got me to the same problem that you mention in your comment to Robotic Cat's answer:parent view controller can find it self in wrong orientation when child is dismissed.

This code (thanks to Corey Floyd's snippet) forces the parent to reorient.

UIViewController *c = [[UIViewController alloc]init];
[self presentViewController:c animated:NO completion:nil];
[self dismissViewControllerAnimated:NO completion:nil];

It should be placed after the point where child view controller gets removed. This one is written for iOS 6.0, you can also use the code from the original link.

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1  
Interesting... will definitely take a look at this. I hacked together a temporary solution involving subscribing to UIDevice orientation change notifications and applying a CGAffineTransform to my image view controller's view, but clearly this solution would be much simpler if it works. Will try it out and report back. Thanks! –  Preston Lewis Oct 9 '12 at 23:46

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