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Right now based on the site name in the URL parameter, we decide the appropriate actions to take(method calls etc) in the Java (Standard Jsp/Servlet web applications). For example, the request would be something like www.oursite.com?site=Ohio Wondering what would be the alternative of doing this without having to provide URL parameter.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why not just code it into the path?

www.oursite.com/Ohio

If you're just using straight servlet api, you can just do something of this nature:

String path = request.getPathInfo();
String site = path.split("/")[0];

That being said, most web frameworks have some support for helping with this. For example, in spring mvc:

@RequestMapping(value="/{site}/blah/blah", method=RequestMethod.GET)
public ModelAndView blahBlah(HttpServletRequest req,
                             HttpServletResponse resp,
                             @PathVariable("site") String site) {
   // do stuff here
}

Of course you could do this at the controller level too if all your methods need that sort of mapping:

@Controller
@RequestMapping(value="/{site}")
public class MyController {
  @RequestMapping(value="/blah/blah", method=RequestMethod.GET)
  public ModelAndView blahBlah(HttpServletRequest req,
                             HttpServletResponse resp,
                             @PathVariable("site") String site) {
     // do stuff here
  }
}

I believe this is cleaner than a query param, though it still shows up in your URL. There's other, more complex methods like using apache's reverse proxying and virtual host capabilities to switch based on site names. You could do something at login, and store the site in session. It all depends on your requirements.

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You could use POST instead of GET.

GET appends request parameters to the end of the URL.

POST sends encoded data using a form.

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1  
Good answer, terrible site to cite. –  EJP Oct 6 '12 at 1:46
    
Yep... almost added a remark like: "here's a crappy link that is horrible." At least it's simple and to the point. –  jahroy Oct 6 '12 at 1:56
1  
Seconded EJP's comment. In my experience, RoseIndia answers are typically poorly written and technically inaccurate. This one is no different. (Great for copy-and-paste programmers though ...) –  Stephen C Oct 6 '12 at 1:57
    
Sorry guys, I just wanted to provide something more than my three sentences. I've replaced the atrocious RoseIndia link. –  jahroy Oct 6 '12 at 2:00

You could use an alternate URL, like ohio.oursite.com. This process could be automated by having your server respond to *.oursite.com. I would probably set up a filter that looked at what the subdomain was and compared that with a predefined list of allowed sites. If it didn't exist, you could redirect back to the main (www) site. If it did, you could set a request attribute that you could use in a similar way that you currently use the request parameter now.

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