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I have two questions - (I)

code-fragment-1

if(<condition-statement>){
}

else if(<condition-statement-2>){
    //statements-1
}
//statements-2

code-fragment-2

if(<condition-statement>){
}

else{
    if(<condition-statement-2>){
        //statements-1
    }
    //statements-2
}

Are the above two code fragments same?

(II) when are else ifs (in C++) used?

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1  
@Dev No it doesn't. It is a simple syntax question, and the answer doesn't depend on anything external. –  EJP Oct 6 '12 at 7:35
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only difference is in example 1 your Statement2 will get executed regardless of the conditions you check. In example 2, Statement2 will only get executed if your if condition is false. Other than that, they're basically the same.

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No, in the first case you execute the else block only if the <codition-statement> is not verified AND only if <condition-statement-2> is verified.

In the second case you execute the else block simply if the <codition-statement> is not verified.

In this case are equivalent until you does not have any //statements-2.

About the question : when is the else if (in c++) used ?

Is used basically under the same conditions of all other languages​​ that have this construct. else is executed as alternative to the related if, else-if is executed as alternative but with an 'attached' if to be verified, otherwise is not executed. So they are not logically equivalent.

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In your first code sample, statement-2 is executed unconditionally. In the second it is conditional. Not the same.

'else if' is generally to be preferred, because you can keep inserting or appending more of them indefinitely, or append an 'else', whereas with the other form you have to endlessly mess around with braces to get the same effect, and you risk altering the semantics, as indeed you have done in your second sample.

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the syntax of an if is really if(condition) statement;

What the {} really do is allow you to group together multiple statements. In your second example you only have one statement(the if) inside your {}s, so yes, both examples are the same, except //statements-2 always gets run when !=true

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Your codes are not same.
However, in general else if and else { if } both the the styles are same.

The 2nd style else { if() } is used, when you have something more to say in else part. e.g.

...
else {
  if () {
    // code
  }
  // something more to say (typically unconditional)
}

Otherwise, it's better to use the simple else if.
From your code, I see that you are better using the 2nd part.

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1  
yes but //statements-2 are something more to say... –  obe6 Oct 6 '12 at 7:22
    
They're not equivalent. Statement-2 is executed unconditionally in the first, conditionally in the second. After your edit your statement about the styles being the same is still wrong, and you then go on to contradict it anyway. –  EJP Oct 6 '12 at 7:28
    
But the fragments are not the same, due to this statements-2 business. –  juanchopanza Oct 6 '12 at 7:28
    
@juanchopanza, EJP, I meant the style earlier and not the particular code fragments. Now modified in the answer. –  iammilind Oct 6 '12 at 7:30
1  
The styles aren't the same, any more than the OP's code fragments were, and what he is asking about is his code. An 'else if' can be followed by another, or an 'else'; the second style cannot. –  EJP Oct 6 '12 at 7:32
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