Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following piece of code gets compiled under g++ 4.6.3 for Linux

#include <iostream>

class A {
  public:  

    int x;
    std::string c;

    A(int x,std::string c):x(10),c("Hi"){
    }

    ~A(){
      std::cout << "Deleting A()" << std::endl;
    }
};

class B : public A {
  public:

    B():A(20,"Hello"){
    }

    ~B(){
      std::cout << "Deleting B()" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main(){
  B o;
  std::cout << o.x << std::endl;
  std::cout << o.c << std::endl;
  return(0);
}

but it does not do what is supposed to do, the type B is not able to change the values of that 2 variables that it inherit from A.

Any explanations about why this doesn't work properly ?

share|improve this question
    
Just because you name the parameters of the constructor the same as your members it does not mean they will be copied by some sort of magic, you will have to do this by hand. –  Nobody Oct 6 '12 at 8:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your base constructor takes those values...and completely disregards them!

Change this:

A(int x,std::string c):x(10),c("Hi"){}

to this:

A(int x,std::string c):x(x),c(c){}
share|improve this answer
    
so i need a constructor defined and i can't use initialization lists ? can you correct my example ? –  axis Oct 6 '12 at 8:09
    
thanks, problem solved, i have misunderstood how initialization lists works. –  axis Oct 6 '12 at 8:11
1  
@axis, I provided the fix. When you call the base constructor in your derived constructor's initialization list, it picks the one with (int, std::string) parameters (the only one), which in turn ignores the arguments you give it. GCC would warn with something like: warning: unused parameter x, warning: unused parameter c. –  chris Oct 6 '12 at 8:11
3  
@axis why don't you use A(int x = 10,std::string c = std::string("Hi")):x(x),c(c){ ... –  enobayram Oct 6 '12 at 8:42
2  
@axis there's virtually no other way of doing what you would like to do, and if you're that concerned about readability, you can always use whitespace in a clever way. for instance, use a separate line for each parameter and align them nicely. I'm sure any seasoned C++ developer can visually parse default values for function parameters after 2 bottles of vodka. If you're that concerned about how this will scale when you have 5 arguments, use boost::parameter library. –  enobayram Oct 6 '12 at 8:52

There seems to be some confusion about what you want and how to achieve this. If I got you right this is what you want:

class A {
  public:  

    int x;
    std::string c;
    //default initization of A
    A():x(10), c("Hi") {}

    //initializing the values of A via parameters
    A(int x,std::string c):x(x),c(c){}

    ~A(){
      std::cout << "Deleting A()" << std::endl;
    }
};

class B : public A {
  public:

    B():A(20,"Hello"){
    }

    ~B(){
      std::cout << "Deleting B()" << std::endl;
    }
};

So in this example:

int main()
{
    A a;
    A a1(2, "foo");
    B b;
    return 0;
}
  • a.x == 10, a.c == "Hi"
  • a1.x == 2, a1.c == "foo"
  • b.x == 20, b.c == "Hello"
share|improve this answer
    
yes, but this is basically an initialization list + 1 constructor for A and an initialization list for B, the second constructor for A it's not a real list, it's more like a compact constructor because does not offer the real core of the init lists meaning that i it doesn't express a default value but just a method interface with assignment for variables. I think that at least for the parent classes is more appropriate the old constructor approach and i will use lists for child classes, if this are all the options, i think that initialization lists are not for my general case. –  axis Oct 6 '12 at 9:36
    
First of all let me note, that you seem to have misunderstood initialization lists. This phrase only means the explicit constructor invocation of member variables/parent classes in a ctor, so all ctors in my example have initialization lists. Now to the meat: The inheritance method should abstract away parameters, so you do not pass all values. As it seems you want to pass all values I think you should rather go with composition, so you declare a member variable of type A inside B and pass an instance of A to copy construct the member. –  Nobody Oct 6 '12 at 9:42

OK, I don't understand what exactly you want and why, but here's a suggestion, with C++11, you can do the following:

struct Base {
        int a;
        float b;
};

struct Derived: public Base {
        Derived(): Base{1,1.0} {}
};

int main() {
        Derived d;
}

as long as the base is a POD type.

I'd still prefer A(int x = 10,std::string c = std::string("Hi")):x(x),c(c){...} though.

IMHO, you need to review if you really need that much control over your base class in the first place. You're not really supposed to micro-manage a class from the outside like that, it's an indication of a flaw in your class hierarchy.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't remember exactly what, but there's something wrong with ({...}). It should simply be {...}. –  chris Oct 6 '12 at 16:03
    
That gives: no matching function for call to ‘Base::Base(<brace-enclosed initializer list>)’ –  enobayram Oct 6 '12 at 16:06
    
Hmm, works on GCC 4.7.2. liveworkspace.org/code/2491a18e301aee392aa075a960666f3c –  chris Oct 6 '12 at 16:08
    
@chris That's true, I've tried with 4.7.0 and it works, not with 4.6.3 though –  enobayram Oct 6 '12 at 16:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.