Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a variable that is a factor :

 $ year           : Factor w/ 8 levels "2003","2004",..: 4 6 4 2 4 1 3 3 7 2 ...

I would like to create 8 dummy variables, named "2003", "2004" etc that take the value 0 or 1 depending on the value that the variable "year" takes. The nearest I could come up with is

dt1 <- cbind (dt1, model.matrix(~dt1$year - 1) )

But this has the unfortunate consequences of

  1. The dummy variables are named dt1$year2003, not just "2003", "2004" etc
  2. It seems that NA rows are omitted altogether by model.matrix (so the above command fails due to different lengths when NA is present in the year variable).

Of course I can get around these problems with more code, but I like my code to be as concise as possible (within reason) so if anyone can suggest better ways to make the dummy variables I would be obliged.

share|improve this question
    
I don't think you can have variable names that start with a number in R: cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/… –  smillig Oct 6 '12 at 9:01
1  
Normally, you wouldn't create a dummy yourself, but use a variable of class 'factor' in a model, whereupon the function that fits the model will construct the model matrix from the factor. If you need them you can then extract the dummies from the model matrix. –  Glen_b Oct 6 '12 at 9:55
    
@Glen_b thank you - that is useful information, so that means I can run a model such as glmer(y~x + (year + 1|school).... where year instead of coding dummy variables and running glmer(y~x + (y1+y2+y3+y4+y5+y6+y7+y8 + 1|school).... and get the same output ? –  Joe King Oct 6 '12 at 10:22
1  
Treatment contrasts are the default for categorial variables in R. –  Sven Hohenstein Oct 6 '12 at 11:05
1  
@smillig: In R, You can have variable names beginning with numbers and underscores, but they should be quoted appropriately. –  Sathish Oct 6 '12 at 15:31
show 7 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is as concise as I could get. The na.action option takes care of the NA values (I would rather do this with an argument than with a global options setting, but I can't see how). The naming of columns is pretty deeply hard-coded, don't see any way to override it within model.matrix ...

options(na.action=na.pass)
dt1 <- data.frame(year=factor(c(NA,2003:2005)))
dt2 <- setNames(cbind(dt1,model.matrix(~year-1,data=dt1)),
              c("year",levels(dt1$year)))

As pointed out above, you may run into trouble in some contexts with column names that are not legal R variable names.

  year 2003 2004 2005
1 <NA>   NA   NA   NA
2 2003    1    0    0
3 2004    0    1    0
4 2005    0    0    1
share|improve this answer
add comment

You could use ifelse() which won't omit na rows (but I guess you might not count it as being "as concise as possible"):

dt1 <- data.frame(year=factor(rep(2003:2010, 10)))  # example data

dt1 <- within(dt1, yr2003<-ifelse(year=="2003", 1, 0))
dt1 <- within(dt1, yr2004<-ifelse(year=="2004", 1, 0))
dt1 <- within(dt1, yr2005<-ifelse(year=="2005", 1, 0))
# ...    

head(dt1)
#   year yr2003 yr2004 yr2005
# 1 2003      1      0      0
# 2 2004      0      1      0
# 3 2005      0      0      1
# 4 2006      0      0      0
# 5 2007      0      0      0
# 6 2008      0      0      0
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.