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I smell something bad here?

    if ($col == 24) {
        $buffer{'Y'} = trim($val);
        return;
    }

    if ($col == 25) {
        $buffer{'Z'} = trim($val);
        return;
    }

    if ($col == 26) {
        $buffer{'AA'} = trim($val);
        return;
    }

    if ($col == 27) {
        $buffer{'AB'} = trim($val);
        return;
    }
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1  
One other thing: I 'smell' some excel automation in there (column Z to AA ... hmm!) Likely you want the named column for a particular column number. Definately look at Tanktalus's answer too. –  Robert P Aug 14 '09 at 3:27
    
This should go on the dailyWTF. It stinks. –  Axeman Aug 14 '09 at 6:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The names look suspicious, too. If you're looping through the columns, try the magic ++ operator.

my $colname = 'A';
for (0..$#cols)
{
   # do stuff with $colname
   $buffer{$colname} = trim($val);
   ++$colname;
}

If not, there does seem to be a pattern here that you can exploit for converting numbers from decimal (digital) to alphabetic. You'd do it the same way you'd convert a digital number to decimal, except that you'd use characters A-Z, base 26, instead of 0-9, base 10. Something like:

sub colname
{
  my $num = shift;
  my $name = '';
  while ($num)
  {
    $name .= chr(ord('A') + $num % 26);
    $num /= 26;
  }
  reverse $name;
}

(untested) This algorithm is language-neutral. It doesn't particularly take advantage of perlishness, but works wonderfully as a general-case.

Update: I told you this was untested. j_random_hacker pointed out the thinko, and I've corrected it. Thanks!

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precisely what I need - thank! –  est Aug 14 '09 at 3:31
2  
Shouldn't that last line read "reverse $name;"? Otherwise good. –  j_random_hacker Aug 14 '09 at 4:52
1  
-1ing to get your attention... ;) –  j_random_hacker Aug 14 '09 at 6:06
    
Fixed, so +2 for you :) –  j_random_hacker Aug 16 '09 at 3:48

Associative arrays work well in these cases. First initialize:

my %colToBuffer = ( 24 => 'Y', 25 => 'Z', 26 => 'AA', 27 => 'AB');

Then the code can be:

if (exists $colToBuffer{$col})
{
    $buffer{$colToBuffer{$col}} = trim($val);
}

Season to taste.

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1  
+1, very concise! Although, probably not too good if you have to initialise a lot of values. –  dreamlax Aug 14 '09 at 3:07
1  
I typed up the equivalent, but in Python since I don't know Perl. I'll just +1 you instead. –  FogleBird Aug 14 '09 at 3:08

Find a way to encode "$col" into a string that represents that column in the hash (i.e. turns 25 into 'Z' and 26 into 'AA' etc).

sub encodeCol {
  ...
}

$buffer{encodeCol($col)} = trim($val);
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+1 for being faster than me –  willoller Aug 14 '09 at 3:03

If $col is in 24..27, then calculate the corresponding letter, and set the proper hash entry. Here are two ways to do it, depending on whether you want to save a few characters or save a few bytes:

24 <= $col && $col <= 27 and $buffer{('A'..'AB')[$col]} = trim($val);

or

24 <= $col && $col <= 27 and $buffer{('Y'..'AB')[$col - 24]} = trim($val);
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In other programming languages, you'd use a switch statement. This page has several ways to emulate a switch statement in Perl (5+).

Of course, if I had bothered to read the question closely, I wouldn't have suggested a switch statement for handling a specific sequence of inputs to outputs.

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1  
perl 5.10.x has default switch (use Switch.pm for older version). But switch statement, imho, is just same ugly as repeated if - only looks cleaner. –  est Aug 14 '09 at 3:12
    
There's no need for a switch statement here, since every option does the same basic thing. As George Phillips demonstrated, a hash works fine. –  friedo Aug 14 '09 at 3:47

In C-like pseudocode, to encode the column numbers:

alphabet[1:26] = {'A','B','C','D',...,'Z'}
col = col + 1; // so that 1=A, ..., 26=Z
string = "";

while(col > 0) {
    letterRank = col % 26; // % for modulo
    string = concatenate(alphabet[letterRank], string);
    col = col / 26; // integer division
}
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