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I have a class which is a subclass of tuple. I want to use instances of that class as elements of a set, but I get the error that it is an unhashable type. I guess this is because I've overridden the __eq__ and __ne__ methods. What should I do to restore my type's hashability? I'm using Python 3.2.

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2  
You will need to implement __hash__() - it's pretty much the first thing you'll find if you do a search for this. –  Lattyware Oct 6 '12 at 9:46
1  
The docs say that, when a class derived from a hashable class but overides eg. __eq__(), it must also override __hash__() for it to be hashable. Since this behavior it not at all obvious it is a legitimate question. Although it may be somewhat localized, I don't think it is too much so. Hence my vote to reopen. –  pillmuncher Mar 30 '13 at 11:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you will need to majke your type hashable, which means implementing the __hash__() member function in your class deriving from tuple.

for example:

class test(tuple):
    def __eq__(self,comp):
        return self[0] == comp[0]
    def __ne__(self,comp):
        return self[0] != comp[0]
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(self[0])

and this is what it looks like now:

>>> set([test([1,]),test([2,]),test([3,])])
{(1,), (2,), (3,)}
>>> hash(test([1,]))
1

note: you should absolutely read the documentation for the __hash__() function, in order to understand the relationship between the comparison operators and the hash computation.

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4  
You can use the original hash function from tuple: tuple.__hash__(self) –  Niklas B. Oct 6 '12 at 9:55
3  
of course you can. you can also use the super class super(test,self).__hash__(self), or anything else for that matter... –  Adrien Plisson Oct 6 '12 at 10:02
1  
Your example is naughty - "The only required property is that objects which compare equal have the same hash value" docs.python.org/reference/datamodel.html#object.__hash__ –  gnibbler Oct 6 '12 at 10:39
1  
This hash function is incorrect because it does not produce the same hashes for instances that compare equal. Also, it's __ne__, not __neq__. –  user4815162342 Oct 6 '12 at 11:05
    
good point, i forgot about the __hash__() function requirements. i edited my answer to reflect this. –  Adrien Plisson Oct 6 '12 at 11:31

objects that compare equal should have the same hash value

So it's a good idea to base the hash on the properties you are using to compare equality

Adrien's example would be better like this

class test(tuple):
    def __eq__(self,comp):
        return self[0] == comp[0]
    def __ne__(self,comp):
        return self[0] != comp[0]
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash((self[0],))

Simply leverage the hash of the tuple containing the stuff we care about for equality

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It's __ne__, not __neq__. –  user4815162342 Oct 6 '12 at 11:06

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