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In Java I have an abstract base class, let's say WrapX, which contains a property of a type, say X (think Decorator DP). This class presents a method to call a specific method on the encapsulated X:

public abstract class WrapX{

  protected X instance;

  public WrapX(X x){
     this.instance = x;
  }

  public void foo(){
       instance.foo();
  }

}

public class X {

   public void foo(){
       System.out.println("foo");
   }
}

There is then a class called Y that extends from X and provides an additional method:

public class Y extends X {

  public void bar(){
     System.out.println("bar");
  }
}

Then naturally I have created WrapY that can be used as a decorated type over the type Y:

public class WrapY extends WrapX{

  ...

  public void bar(){
    instance.bar();
  }

}

So herein lies the issue. WrapY has inherited the instance property of type X from its parent WrapX. As far as Eclipse is concerned, instance is of type X and so will complain that it contains no method .bar().

Fair enough of course, but how then in this subclass can we implicitly cast the instance to an instance of Y (a valid subclass of the initial type X)... WITHOUT the need for explicit cast ascriptions littering the code, or variable shadowing?

If I just had this in the constructor:

public WrapY(Y y){
 this.instance = y;
}

Eclipse still complains that .bar() is not a method of type X because I guess it cannot infer for certain that WrapY(Y y) will be used prior to construct the WrapY instance:

public void bar(){
        instance.bar(); // ERROR
      }

Here is the current approach I have, littered with casts:

public WrapY(Y y){
 (Y)instance = y;
}

public void bar(){
  ((Y)instance).bar();
}

I haven't come across this particular type of architectural problem in my experience before, file it under 'Decorator-Based-Inheritance-Type-Casting'(!)... Please enlighten me as to how I can model this in a better way.

Another issue is that, if in future someone extends WrapY, the type of instance their class inherits will be the natural (uncasted) type of X, when they may reasonably assume it should be of type Y.

Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could make your Wrap class generic, for example:

public abstract class Wrap<T extends X>{

    protected T instance;

    public Wrap(T x){
        this.instance = x;
    }

    public void foo(){
       instance.foo();
    }
}



public final class WrapY extends Wrap<Y> {

    public WrapY(Y y) {
        super(y);
    }

    public void bar(){
        instance.bar();
    }
}

Then for instances of WrapY, instance will be a Y.


Update: If you want to inherit from WrapY, too (and address your last issue of the wrapped type being the most appropriate), do:

public class WrapY<U extends Y> extends Wrap<U> {

    public WrapY(U y) {
        super(y);
    }

    public void bar(){
        instance.bar();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the input, I like this idea. However, if I added WrapZ which extended from WrapY extends WrapX<Y>, then T would still be of type Y in WrapZ. If I have WrapZ extends WrapX<Z> then WrapZ will not be in the correct place in the inheritance hierarchy, ie. it won't inherit from WrapY (and so won't have inherited methods/properties from WrapY. How would you solve this? Do I need to make all classes generic? eg. WrapY<T extends Y> extends WrapX<Y> so that I can have WrapZ extends WrapY<Z>? Thanks – ComethTheNerd Oct 6 '12 at 10:41
    
@HodeCode: see update – DaveFar Oct 6 '12 at 10:55
    
Perfect! Thanks so much, this is much cleaner than my current implementation. Especially, given that some classes have rather a lot of methods! Out of interest though, if WrapY is final, I can't extend from it? Does it need to be final? – ComethTheNerd Oct 6 '12 at 10:58
    
@DaveBall Nice update – MattR Oct 6 '12 at 10:59
    
@HodeCode: sorry 'bout the copy&paste-error: in the second case, you generify WrapY to be able to inherit from it - so final didn't make much sense. – DaveFar Oct 6 '12 at 15:12

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