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I'm sure that I'm missing something simple here. I'm trying to follow a Code First Entity Framework tutorial which tells me to use some Data Annotations.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;

namespace Model
{
    public class Destination
    {
        public int DestinationId { get; set; }

        [Required]
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Country { get; set; }
        [MaxLength(500)]
        public string Description { get; set; }

        [Column(TypeName="image")]
        public byte Photo { get; set; }

        public List<Lodging> Lodgings { get; set; }
    }
}

The compiler doesn't have any issues with the first two annotations but it doesn't seem to like: [Column(TypeName="image")].

Errors:

  • The type or namespace name 'Column' could not be found.

  • The type or namespace name 'ColumnAttribute' could not be found.

I'm using Visual Studio 2012 and Entity Frameworks 5.

Any suggestions?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 20 down vote accepted

In Entity Framework 4.3.1, ColumnAttribute is defined in System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations namspace , which is available in EntityFramework.dll. So if you have a reference to that dll and a using statement to the namespace, you should be fine.

In Entity Framework 5, It is in System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.Schema namspace, So you need to add a reference to that in your class.

using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.Schema;

You can read more detailed information about it here.

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After adding the reference, I had to do a full clean and rebuild. Just rebuilding didn't work. –  Joseph Snow Jan 20 at 18:13

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