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I'm "converting" from .NET to Java. I wonder why a code below is not working

class MyClass{
  private final int intVar;  //ok
  private final Paint paint; //error "Variable paint might not have been initialized"

  public MyClass(){
       intVar = 12; 
       initializePaint(); 
  }

  private void initializePaint(){
       paint = new Paint();  //error  "cannot assign a variable to final variable"
  }

}
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can you post what error message did you getting? –  Ami Oct 6 '12 at 10:06

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should initialize final fields at the place where declared in class or in constructor.

Initialization of final fields is allowed in constructor because constructor is called only once while object creation.

As you initialized it in method initializePaint(), you will get compiler error because this method can be called multiple times and final variable/field is constant and can not be changed. As you would be calling initializePaint() method multiple times, multiple times initialization of final field which is wrong. Therefore Compiler will give an error for it.

class MyClass{
  private final int intVar;  //ok
  private final Paint paint;// paint = new Paint(); to avoid //error "Variable paint might not have been initialized"

  public MyClass(){
       intVar = 12; 
       //initializePaint(); 
       paint = new Paint(); // here initialized And allowed.
  }

  private void initializePaint(){
       paint = new Paint();  //error  "cannot assign a variable to final variable"
  }
}
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Because initializePaint() method can be called from any place, not just the constructor. And Java compiler wants to ensure that the final variable is assigned only once, in the constructor. So you have to move the assignment to the constructor.

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Yes, it can. But in my case it's called from contsructor. –  Marius Kavansky Oct 6 '12 at 10:19
4  
Right, but compiler cannot confirm that you will not call it from another place. –  Sameer Oct 6 '12 at 10:21
    
@AlanDert : another place would be the same class because method is private, which can be called from another methods in the class. –  Nandkumar Tekale Oct 6 '12 at 10:40

Final instance variables of a class must be instantiated in the scope of the constructor. Move the initialization of the Paint object to the constructor and use a getter getPainter in your initialization method.

BTW +1 for using final vars. It's a good coding practice. IMO Java should have a 'mutable' keyword to variables and have final as default.

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Is not that better to say just private final Paint paint = new Paint();? –  Marius Kavansky Oct 6 '12 at 10:13
    
@AlanDert that's a question of style. Personally, I don't like static initialization that much. (Except on tests where we use that widely) –  maasg Oct 6 '12 at 11:07
    
@maasg that's not static initialization... –  yshavit Oct 6 '12 at 12:15
    
@yshavit Yes, you're right. Wrong term. Is there a name for inline initialization of member variables in a class? –  maasg Oct 6 '12 at 17:48
    
@maasg I'm actually not sure! –  yshavit Oct 8 '12 at 4:39

A final variable only initialize at the time of deceleration of that variable or also u can initialize it through constructor .

Ex:

class MyClass{
 private final int intVar;  
  private final Paint paint; 

  public MyClass(){
   intVar = 12; 
   paint= new Paint(); 
 }
}
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In your code you didn't initialize the final variable. this variable is called BLANK FINAL variable. Now you have to initialize it in the constructor. otherwise you will get the error because the value of the variable will be null.

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The compiler sees that you call the initializePaint() method on the constructor, but not that this method would set the paint variable. You need to explicitely set the paint field in the constructor like:

class MyClass{
  private final int intVar;  //ok
  private final Paint paint; //error

  public MyClass(){
       intVar = 12; 
       paint= new Paint(); 
  }
}
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Initialization of all final variable must happen in the constructor and not somewhere in the call hierarchy of a method call from the constructor (like initializePaint() in your case).

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final means once assigned, you cannot reassign-it and you need to assign it in the constructor. So you cannot have a method reassigning paint

EDIT: Some reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Final_(Java)

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i think that is more appropriate to define final as a keyword that avoids a re-definition and not a re-assignment because it's a better reminder to the fact that your are using an OO language. –  axis Oct 6 '12 at 10:13
    
re-definition for a final class, yes but I think "assignement" is more appropriate for variables. –  RC. Oct 6 '12 at 10:16

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