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i propose a recursive implementation for checking whether binary search tree is valid:

/*
  Return true if binary tree is a binary search tree
*/
bool BinaryTree::isBinarySearchTree(BinaryTree* tree, int& prev)
{
    if(!isBinarySearchTree(tree->left, tree->data)) // left
         return false;

    if(tree->value > prev) // here
        return false;
    else
        prev = tree->value;

    return isBinaryTree(tree->right); // right
}

i have big doubt on the second check,

    if(tree->value > prev) // here
        return false;

whats your favorite c++ implementation for this problem?

EDIT

how would you extend to find larger BST in given tree?

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marked as duplicate by Dukeling Jun 17 at 11:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You have the right idea, but you need to check both lower and upper limits. At the root, the limits are -infinity, +infinity; when you recurse on the left you replace the upper limit, and on the right you replace the lower limit. –  rici Oct 6 '12 at 14:21
1  
+1, because obviously a lot of people get this question wrong. –  rici Oct 6 '12 at 14:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's amazing how many people get this wrong.

Here's an example of a tree which the naive solution fails to reject:

                5
              /   \
             /     \
            4       6
           / \     / \
          1   7   1   7

Every invocation of a naive check will succeed, since every parent is between its children. Yet, it is clearly not a well-formed binary search tree.

Here's a quick solution:

bool test(Tree* n,
  int min=std::numeric_limits<int>::min(),
  int max=std::numeric_limits<int>::max()) {
  return !n || ( 
         min < n->data && n->data < max
         && test(n->left, min, n->data)
         && test(n->right, n->data, max));
}

This isn't perfect, because it requires that neither INT_MIN nor INT_MAX be present in the tree. Often, BST nodes are ordered by <= instead of <, and making that change would only reserve one value instead of two. Fixing the whole thing is left as an exercise.

Here's a demonstration of how the naive test gets it wrong:

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>
#define T new_tree

struct Tree{
  Tree* left;
  int data;
  Tree* right;
};

Tree* T(int v) { return new Tree{0, v, 0}; }
Tree* T(Tree* l, int v, Tree* r) { return new Tree{l, v, r}; }

bool naive_test(Tree* n) {
  return n == 0 || ((n->left == 0 || n->data > n->left->data)
      && (n->right == 0 || n->data < n->right->data)
      && naive_test(n->left) && naive_test(n->right));
}

bool test(Tree* n,
  int min=std::numeric_limits<int>::min(),
  int max=std::numeric_limits<int>::max()) {
  return !n || ( 
         min < n->data && n->data < max
         && test(n->left, min, n->data)
         && test(n->right, n->data, max));
}

const char* goodbad(bool b) { return b ? "good" : "bad"; }

int main(int argc, char**argv) {
  auto t = T( T( T(1),4,T(7)), 5, T(T(1),6,T(7)));
  std::cerr << "Naive test says " << goodbad(naive_test(t))
            << "; Test says " << goodbad(test(t)) << std::endl;
  return 0;
}
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Excellent solution –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 7 '12 at 4:46

Recursive impelentation:

bool is_bst (node *root, int min = INT_MIN, int max = INT_MAX)
{
    if (root)
    {
        // check min/max constaint
        if (root->data <= min || root->data >= max) 
          return false;

        if (root->left != NULL)
         {
           // check if the left node is bigger
           // or if it is not BST tree itself
           if (root->data < root->left->data ||
               !is_bst (root->left, min, root->data))
            return false;
         }

        if (root->right != NULL)
         {
           // check if the right node is smaller
           // or if it is not BST tree itself
           if (root->data > root->right->data ||
               !is_bst (root->right, root->data, max))
            return false;
         }
    }
    return true;
}

Iterative impelentation

    node_type curr = root;
    node_type prev = null;
    std::stack<node_type> stack;
    while (1)
    {
        if(curr != null)
        {
            stack.push (curr);
            curr = curr->left;
            continue;
        }
        if(stack.empty()) // done
            return true;

        curr = stack.pop ();
        if (prev != null)
        {   
            if(curr->data < prev->data)
                return false;
        }
        prev = curr;
        curr = curr->right;
    }
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1  
same old bug. And the iterative solution is really unlikely to be any faster. If you're worried about really unbalanced trees, put a depth limit in the check, too; a good BST shouldn't be more than k*log2(n) deep for some small value of k. –  rici Oct 6 '12 at 14:41
    
I am sorry what is the same old bug? It's just escaping right now. And the iterative solution might not be that much faster but saves memory. In some embedded systems memory management can be a very big concern, and recursion relies more heavily on the stack than iteration and the stack can overflow way too easily. I've dealt with such problems and they can be a pain. –  tozka Oct 6 '12 at 15:36
1  
The bug is the one I referred to in a comment to an answer which vanished, but I've added a note in my answer which you can look at. –  rici Oct 6 '12 at 18:51
    
Oh, yes, of course. I must've hit myself in the head. I got it fixed, thanks –  tozka Oct 6 '12 at 19:47

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