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Im trying to get the average of price in the products table and store it in a variable called average.

Heres my code:

def index
    @products = Product.all
    @average = 0
    @i = 0

    @products.each do |p|
       i += 1
       average += p.price
    end

    average = average / i
end

Im getting error "undefined method `+' for nil:NilClass" on the "i += 1 statement"

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're setting up i as an instance variable (@i), but calling it as a regular variable (i).

Either take away the @ when you initialize it to zero, or change references to i to @i.

You probably don't want to re-use your i after this method, so you probably just want a regular variable. Like so. (You also have a similar problem with your @average, which you probably do want to persist after the method.)

def index
    @products = Product.all
    @average = 0
    i = 0

    @products.each do |p|
       i += 1
       @average += p.price
    end

    @average = @average / i
end

There is a much cleaner way of working out averages from ActiveRecord collections (you could be doing it directly in the SQL), but I won't mention those since what you're doing is probably a good way to learn Ruby.

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Thanks. I thought you had to declare all variables with the @ sign. Im a java programmer trying to learn ruby –  user1352609 Oct 6 '12 at 10:40
1  
Ah, makes sense. I'm sure you know the difference, but for the purpose of anyone else reading: @ denotes an instance variable, that is, a variable that exists within the scope of the entire object. The other type of variable used (sans-@) is only available within the most "local" scope. As I say, though, this is a pretty inefficient way to work out averages, but it's a good start. –  Edd Morgan Oct 6 '12 at 10:42
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In Ruby on Rails there are predefined aggregate methods for your models to calculate average, sum, count, minimum, maximum, etc.

In your special case, you can do the following:

@average = Product.average(:price)

It will dispatch the actual work to the SQL which will do a better job than a Ruby code. It will produce an SQL query like (this is a MySQL example):

SELECT AVG(`products`.`price`) AS avg_id FROM `products`
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Use.. i think you forgot @ sign

def index
        @products = Product.all
        @average = 0
        @i = 0

        @products.each do |p|
           @i += 1
           @average += p.price
        end

        @average = @average / @i
    end
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