Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i am trying to create a 2 dimensional pointer class array. Because i need a grid of class objects. Right now i'm getting an error that says:

testApp.cpp|53|error: no match for 'operator[]' in '((testApp*)this)->testApp::myCell[i]'|

// this is cell.h
class Cell
{


public:
    int x;
};

.

// this is testApp.h

class testApp : public ofBaseApp{
public:

    int width;
    int height;
    int Grid;
    int space;
    float wWidth;
    float wHeight;
    Cell myCell;


    void setup();
    void update();
    void draw();
};

.' // and this is testapp.cpp // this is where the error is

 void testApp::setup(){


Cell *myCell[5][5];
myCell[1][0]->x =2;
myCell[2][0]->x =1;
myCell[3][0]->x =23;
myCell[4][0]->x =4;
myCell[5][0]->x =7;
myCell[0][0]->x =4;



}

//--------------------------------------------------------------
void testApp::draw(){

ofSetColor(255,255,0);
for (int i = 0; i<5; i++) {
    int q = myCell[i][0]->x;     // i get the error here. 
    ofCircle(20*q,20*q,50);
}
}

I don't understand why there is a problem with adressing the myCell pointer and the x parameter.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Is there a special reason to use Cell, which only exposes an int x publicly instead of directly using int for myCell? –  Nobody Oct 6 '12 at 10:55
1  
Also note, that your myCell array in setup is not initialized, meaning that the pointers in this array are invalid and dereferencing them will result in undefined behavior. –  Nobody Oct 6 '12 at 11:02
    
right now int x is a test. later on i need to draw various shapes based on several variables of myCell –  Bluefarmer Oct 6 '12 at 11:10
    
That might justify the use of Cell, but let me ask why you use a pointer array. It just adds unnecessary complexity and hence increases the risk of errors. –  Nobody Oct 6 '12 at 11:16

3 Answers 3

You have two objects named myCell. The first is a member of testApp with type Cell:

class testApp : public ofBaseApp {
  public:
    // ...
    Cell myCell;
    // ...
}

The other object named myCell is created in your testApp::setup() function and is of type array of 5 array of 5 pointer to Cell.

void testApp::setup() {
    Cell *myCell[5][5]; // This hides the previous myCell
    // ...
}

Within the setup() function, you are hiding the member myCell. When the function ends, the array version of myCell goes out of scope and doesn't exist any more. So first things first, you want to fix the definition of the member myCell:

class testApp : public ofBaseApp {
  public:
    // ...
    Cell* myCell[5][5];
    // ...
}

And remove the definition of myCell in setup():

void testApp::setup() {
    // ...
}

You now have only one object called myCell which is a 2D array of pointers to myCell. But now we have another problem to solve. You have this array of pointers but they aren't currently pointing anywhere - they're uninitialized. You can't just try to do myCell[1][0]->x because there is no Cell object being pointed to at index [1][0].

One way to get around this is to loop through the entire array, using new to dynamically allocate space for all the Cells. You would do this as follows:

void testApp::setup() {
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
            myCell[i][j] = new Cell();
        }
    }
    // ...
}

However, a much better method is to not use dynamic allocation (new) at all. If you simply define myCell to be an array of Cells, rather than an array of pointers to Cell, the Cells will be allocated on the stack automatically. This involves changing the member definition to:

class testApp : public ofBaseApp {
  public:
    // ...
    Cell myCell[5][5];
    // ...
}

Now when your testApp instance is created, the array will be allocated automatically. Now you can set up the contents of the array as follows:

void testApp::setup() {
    myCell[1][0].x = 2;
    myCell[2][0].x = 1;
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for this thorough explanation. I will stick to the array of Cells instead of the pointer array. Thanks –  Bluefarmer Oct 6 '12 at 11:59

It seems like you are trying to refer to myCell from testApp::setup() in testApp::draw(), but you only can access the member testApp::myCell there, which is of type Cell and therefore does not support the operations you want.

Edit

One possible source of the crash you are mentioning could be your setup() function. You are using unitialized pointers there. With the change you mentioned in your comment you also should change your code in setup to:

void testApp::setup(){
  //remove the next line to not shadow the member declaration
  //Cell *myCell[5][5];
  //replace -> by . as you are not handling pointers anymore
  myCell[1][0].x =2;
  myCell[2][0].x =1;
  myCell[3][0].x =23;
  myCell[4][0].x =4;
  myCell[5][0].x =7;
  myCell[0][0].x =4;
}
share|improve this answer
    
ok, well i seem to get past the error when i put 'Cell myCell[5][5];' in testapp.h. But then when i run it, it stops after a while with no result saying, application stopped working. –  Bluefarmer Oct 6 '12 at 10:56
    
You should try to debug your program to see were it stopped and why, but probably it is because of an access violation. –  Nobody Oct 6 '12 at 11:03
1  
may be you didn't allocated memory to the pointers... In Cell myCell[5][5]; each Cell should have a memory allocated to it.. –  bhuwansahni Oct 6 '12 at 11:03
    
Well, your edit post did it for me. I am not handling pointers anymore now. If this is the best option then i'll stick with this. I am trying to still get an array with pointers but i keep getting 'application stopped working –  Bluefarmer Oct 6 '12 at 11:32
    
@Bluefarmer I don't see why you want to stick to pointers. If there is a good reason for this then it might be the better option but I cannot judge if you do not tell me this reason. –  Nobody Oct 6 '12 at 11:34

Your variable myCell is only defined within the scope of testApp::setup. Therefore, you cannot access it within the scope of testApp::draw. Think of making it an attribute of your testApp class.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I currently have Cell myCell as an attribute in testapp.h. How can i initialize the pointer array in the testapp class and depict the size in testapp::setup? –  Bluefarmer Oct 6 '12 at 11:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.