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Since I don't have a machine to test this I kindly need your help here.

  • If I assign L.head = NULL will the L gets empty because there is no head ?

  • If I assign L.head = L.next.next(3rd node) the previous two nodes will be as a Garbage Collector (assuming using Java) correct?

My attempt to write a method cutToInteger for the photo below is the following, correct it if I'm wrong:

void cutToInteger (IntSLList L , int n){

    IntSLList tmp =L.head ;
    while( tmp != NULL || !tmp.into.equals(n)){
            tmp=tmp.next;
    }
    L.head = tmp;
}

The implementation seems easy but the logic of the nodes becoming a garbage data to get removed always confuses me.

enter image description here

UPDATE: Here is the Question for the above screenshot

A method void cutToNumber(IntSLList L, int n) that cuts an integer singly linked list L starting from the head until it reaches integer n. If n is not in L, the list becomes empty.

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I think there is a mistake in the method I wrote. tmp should copy the list L . –  Sobiaholic Oct 6 '12 at 13:47
    
Answer to your first two questions: Yes, I believe so because now nothing is referencing the head node, thus it becomes garbage collected. Similar concept for the second question. –  Clark Oct 6 '12 at 14:00
    
i think while loop should be while( tmp->next != NULL || !tmp.into.equals(n)) –  rbhawsar Oct 6 '12 at 14:16
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted
  1. in your loop it should be && operator rather than || ,otherwise it always will stop only at the end of the link.

  2. n is int, so you have to use ==\!= operators for compare it with other int.

the method should be something like :

void cutToInteger (IntSLList L , int n){    
    IntSLList tmp =L.head;
    while( tmp != NULL && tmp.into != n ){
         tmp=tmp.next;
    }
    L.head = tmp;
}
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So, the next node after the tail will be NULL correct? tmp=tmp.next (where tmp is currently the tail) then L.head = tmp which it is NULL . It will empty the whole list L correct? into I've never used it before. –  Sobiaholic Oct 6 '12 at 14:09
    
Yes, the next of the last node should be null and it will empty the list.. –  Grisha Oct 6 '12 at 14:12
    
Well it's very clear now! Thanks Sir! –  Sobiaholic Oct 6 '12 at 14:19
    
You are welcome –  Grisha Oct 7 '12 at 5:58
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(In the below text, "reachable" is shorthand for "reachable if the IntSLList object is reachable".)

If I assign L.head = NULL will the L gets empty because there is no head ?

It depends on the definition of your linked list. Your diagram includes a tail pointer, so barring updates to that one, the last element will remain reachable (and hence not be garbage collected). But as the other nodes are not reachable from the last node, they may (assuming there are no other references to them) become unreachable and thus eligible for garbage collection.

If I assign L.head = L.next.next(3rd node) the previous two nodes will be as a Garbage Collector (assuming using Java) correct?

Yes, by the same reasoning, and still assuming there are no other references to those two nodes.

A method void cutToNumber(IntSLList L, int n) that cuts an integer singly linked list L starting from the head until it reaches integer n. If n is not in L, the list becomes empty.

As before, the tail remains untouched, so at least the last node will remain reachable, though all other nodes may become unreachable.

Note that your code contains a bug, the condition should contain a logical and, not a logical or, to properly stop when reaching the end (right now, it will evaluate the second condition if tmp == null and you'll get a NPE from the tmp.into bit). And of course a list with no head but a tail is pretty confusing (I dare say it's a bug).

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You are thinking about this too hard. An object becomes collectable when there are no string references to it.

In your example, it becomes collectable when you no longer have any references to the object. It's no more complicated than that.

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Have a look at the java.util.LinkedList -- it seems to do the same thing.

1) Correct! Since the head-pointer points to nothing (null pointer) then your list should be considered "empty" and should return size=0.

2) The garbage collector is smart. Since nobody points to (5) after your "cut" then object 5 is available for collection leaving 8 available next, then 4, then 12. The collector might spot them all at once. The order and timing of the actual collection is up to the collector implementation (in a short/small program the collector might not even run at all).

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