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I need to create two different black binary rectangles using Matlab, to overlay a part of both and to extract the insertion.

How can I overlay two binary images?

-------|----------|
|      |     2    |
|    1 |----|-----|
|           |
|-----------|

I created my two binary images using the false(X, Y) Matlab function.

I dont find how to produce the merge the two images and to extract the insertion.

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by insertion? Do you mean intersection? Also that function doesn't produce "images", it just produces matrices. – engineerC Oct 6 '12 at 15:02
    
The insertion.. The place where the two matrix are surimpose.. you cahn do an imshow and it will output an image (false(x,y)). – Pier-Alexandre Bouchard Oct 6 '12 at 15:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make a background matrix that can contain both rectangles before you translate them, and assign values of the background matrix to the areas where your rectangles will be. This way you have two matrices of the same size, on which you can do logical or arithmetic operations. If you use different values for each rectangle and the background, things like sums will show up in different colors. Here's a text version that demonstrates:

octave:11> bga = bgb = ones(10,10)
bga =

   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1

octave:12> bgb
bgb =

   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1

octave:13> a=false(3,4)
a =

   0   0   0   0
   0   0   0   0
   0   0   0   0

octave:14> b=false(5,5)
b =

   0   0   0   0   0
   0   0   0   0   0
   0   0   0   0   0
   0   0   0   0   0
   0   0   0   0   0

octave:15> bga(3:5,4:7) = a
bga =

   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   1   1   1
   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   1   1   1
   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1

octave:16> bgb(1:5,1:5) = b
bgb =

   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1
   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1
   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1
   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1
   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1

octave:17> bga | bgb
ans =

   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   0   0   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   0   0   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   0   0   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
share|improve this answer
    
"Make a background matrix that can contain both rectangles before you translate them". The output is actually the matrix which contain the two rectangles! – Pier-Alexandre Bouchard Oct 6 '12 at 15:49
    
I don't understand, was your question answered or not? – engineerC Oct 6 '12 at 17:14
    
It was the AND operator at the end, but your answer was good. Thank you! – Pier-Alexandre Bouchard Oct 7 '12 at 14:27
    
Ah, ok. I would call that the "union". – engineerC Oct 7 '12 at 21:03
    
Yeah, probably. I tried to translate it from french, so..! – Pier-Alexandre Bouchard Oct 8 '12 at 2:30

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