Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to change the default session time out in my jsf application that uses shiro for security and session management. It defaults to 30 minutes.

Following is my shiro configuration

<filter>
    <filter-name>ShiroFilter</filter-name>
    <filter-class>org.apache.shiro.web.servlet.IniShiroFilter</filter-class>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>config</param-name>
        <param-value>
        [main]

        authc = com.foo.bar
        authcRealm = com.foo.barAuthenticatingRealm
        sessionManager = org.apache.shiro.web.session.mgt.DefaultWebSessionManager
        securityManager.sessionManager = $sessionManager
        securityManager.sessionManager.globalSessionTimeout = 20000

        unAuthc = com.foo.UnauthorisedFilter



        /** = authc

        </param-value>
    </init-param>
</filter>
<filter-mapping>
    <filter-name>ShiroFilter</filter-name>
    <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
    <dispatcher>REQUEST</dispatcher>
    <dispatcher>FORWARD</dispatcher>
    <dispatcher>INCLUDE</dispatcher>
    <dispatcher>ERROR</dispatcher>
</filter-mapping>

On using the above config, I am logged out immediately on login. Removing the following lines defaults the timeout to 30 mins

        sessionManager = org.apache.shiro.web.session.mgt.DefaultWebSessionManager
        securityManager.sessionManager = $sessionManager
        securityManager.sessionManager.globalSessionTimeout = 20000
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well after trying to search on the net and failing, and failing here too, I finally managed to find a way (sort of hack and not the best way). Here it goes

Shiro by default creates a security manager of the type DefaultWebSecurityManager, so went ahead to extend it. Intercepted its createSubject() method and set the timeout there as follows

public class SecurityManager extends DefaultWebSecurityManager {    
    @Override
    public Subject createSubject(SubjectContext subjectContext) {
        Subject subject = super.createSubject(subjectContext);
        subject.getSession().setTimeout(10 * 60 * 1000);
        return subject;
    }
}

Then assigned this SecurityManager to sessionManager (Very strange why they call a security manager a session manager, i wasted a lot of time before figuring this out) in the config as follows

[main]
authc = com.foo.bar
authcRealm = com.foo.barAuthenticatingRealm
sessionManager = com.foo.securityManager
unAuthc = com.foo.UnauthorisedFilter
/** = authc

I don't think this is the only way to do it, I am sure there are much better ways, probably less hacky, better performant, but this worked for me, without any noticeable performance hit (though I did observe this method getting called several times, probably once per http request). Please leave another answer if you know of a better way, and I'll be more than happy to re accept a better solution.

share|improve this answer

Try putting :

<session-config>
  <!-- web.xml expects the session timeout in minutes: -->
  <session-timeout>1</session-timeout>
</session-config>

on your web.xml

share|improve this answer
    
Would shiro be picking the timeout from here too? –  Jugal Thakkar Oct 9 '12 at 12:13
    
It works for me, I can't explain why though –  Gryzorz Oct 29 '12 at 13:22

The DefaultWebSessionManager seems faulty (at least in Shiro 1.1.0). Use the manager relying on HttpSession, which is the default or can be enabled explicitly by setting the session mode to http.

Shiro will then apply the globalSessionTimeout to all new http sessions. This code configures the session manager and the timeout (in milliseconds):

securityManager.sessionMode = http
securityManager.sessionManager.globalSessionTimeout = 3600000

Shiro will always apply a timeout, even if you don't specify one yourself. Default is 30 minutes in 1.1.0.

Be aware that the timeout is set with setMaxInactiveInterval on the HttpSession, so your container might decide to follow other settings and invalidate the session earlier. See for example Gryzorz's answer.

Other frameworks also like to call setMaxInactiveInterval to install their own settings.

share|improve this answer

AbstractNativeSessionManager's applyGlobalSessionTimeout() method is having the code session.setTimeout(getGlobalSessionTimeout()); If you override applyGlobalSessionTimeout() to not call setTimeout, it should take the custom timeout.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.