Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I more or less get the basic idea behind single linked list, but having trouble with inserting elements in a doubly linked list. Basically I am having trouble linking prev and next pointers to the appropriate nodes. Thanks in advance for help. Here is how my code looks like.

LinkedList.h

template <class T>
class LinkedList{
      protected:
        LinkedListNode<T>* head;
      public:
        LinkedList():head(NULL){}
        ~LinkedList();
        void insert(const T& x);
};


//inserting
template <class T>
void LinkedList<T>::insert(const T& x) {
 LinkedListNode<T>* head = new LinkedListNode<T>(head->prev, x, head->next);
 if(head != NULL){
         head->prev = head->next;
         head->next = head;
  }       
}

LinkedListNode.h

class LinkedListNode{
      protected:
        LinkedListNode<T>* prev;
        T value;
        LinkedListNode<T>* next;
        LinkedListNode(LinkedListNode<T>* p, const T& x, LinkedListNode<T>* n):prev(p), value(x), next(n) {}
        ~doublyLinkedListNode();
        template <class S> friend class doublyLinkedList;
};

I tried modifying the insert function as following, but it gave segmentation fault. What is wrong with my implementation?

template <class T>
void LinkedList<T>::insert(const T& x) {
 LinkedListNode<T>* head;
 if(head == NULL){
        head->value = x;
        head->prev = NULL;
        head->next = head;

 }
else{   LinkedListNode<T>* newnode;
        newnode->value = x;
        newnode->prev = head->next;
        newnode->next = newnode;
        head = newnode;
 }
share|improve this question
2  
To start with, do it on paper with arrows for the pointers. Secondly, don't create your own list when you have std::list. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 6 '12 at 16:15
3  
@JoachimPileborg Minor point: It's great to create your own list. You just shouldn't use it (except of course testing it). –  delnan Oct 6 '12 at 16:15
    
In your latest code for insert, you declare a local variable head when there's already a member variable head. Later, when you say head, the compiler can't guess which one you mean (or rather, it guesses wrong). –  Beta Oct 6 '12 at 16:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're a victim of variable shadowing.

Lets have a look at your original version:

//inserting
template <class T> void LinkedList<T>::insert(const T& x) {
   LinkedListNode<T>* head = new LinkedListNode<T>(head->prev, x, head->next);
   // ...

We're going to dissect the first instruction of your function:

   LinkedListNode<T>* head; // not initialized value
   new LinkedListNode<T>(head->prev, x, head->next); // oh oh....

head is a new variable and your original this->head is shadowed. But even if you fix this problem, the initial this->head is still NULL and thus this->head->prev will result in a segmentation fault. You fix the latter in your second version, but only there's still something wrong:

template

void LinkedList<T>::insert(const T& x) {
 LinkedListNode<T>* head; // #1
 if(head == NULL){
        // #2
        head->value = x;
        head->prev = NULL;
        head->next = head;

 }
else{   LinkedListNode<T>* newnode;
        newnode->value = x;
        newnode->prev = head->next; // #3
        newnode->next = newnode;    // #3
        head = newnode;
 }

The first error (#1) is, again, variable shadowing. #2 is again a segmentation fault, since you didn't allocate memory for your head.

#3 are logical errors. The previous node should be the head itself, and the node following a node shouldn't be the node itself.

share|improve this answer
    
Great, thanks for the detail feedback. –  intsymmetry Oct 6 '12 at 17:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.